10 English Quad 2

The Chrysalids

 

The Chrysalids Audio Book

Part 1

 

The Chrysalids Audio Book

Part 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quad 2 Dates

 

Discussion 1
The Chrysalids

Chapter 1

1. What do we know about the characters introduced in chapter 1?
a) David
b) Rosalind
c) Sophie
d) Mrs. Wender

2. What happens to Sophie's foot and why is she afraid to take off her shoe?

3. What does David think of Sophie's house? Why?

4. What is the secret that David must keep?

5. What is the "Definition of Man"?

6. What does David mean when he describes the following interaction with Mrs. Wonder? "I thought back to her, trying to reassure her and show her that she need not be anxious about me, but the thought didn't reach her."

 

Discussion 2
The Chrysalids

Chapters 2-3

1. Describe the town of Waknuk.

2. Who is Elias Strorm? Joseph Strorm?

3. Write down the sayings that are on the walls of David's house.

4. What are Offences? Deviations?

5. Explain what is meant by:
a) Wild Country
b) Fringes
c) Badlands

6. Why was Sophie's dad distrustful of David in particular?

7. Why is David's father upset when David says "I could have managed it all right by myself if I had another hand"?

 

Discussion 3
The Chrysalids

Chapter 4

1. What secret does David's Uncle Axel find out? How does he react?

2. Who are the Old People?

3. Why do the Fringes people raid the "civilized" areas?

4. Why does one of the Fringes' prisoners look like David's father?

5. Why is Joseph Strorm upset that Angus Morton acquires a pair of great-horses?

6. What do we learn about the world when David explains his knowledge to Sophie?

7. What is Tribulation? How is it related to the biblical tale of the Flood?

 

Discussion 4
The Chrysalids

Chapter 5

1. How is Sophie's secret about her toes revealed to Alan. How does David try to protect her?

2. How does Sophie feel about herself given the way she is treated in her community?

3. Why does Sophie's family have to flee? Why does David want to go with them?

4. What are the consequences for David for trying to give Sophie and her family a chance to escape?

 

Discussion 5
The Chrysalids

Chapter 6

1. Evaluate the arguments the inspector uses to claim that Sophie is not human?

2. Why does David want to run away from Waknuk?

3. What are the "Blacklands" that Uncle Axel describes to David?

4. What have sailors discovered in places south of the Blacklands?

5. What is Uncle Axel's main conclusion from the discovery of the lands to the far south and the people who live there?

6. Why does David decide not to run away?

 

Discussion 6
The Chrysalids

Chapters 7-8

1. When David's sister, Petra, is born, why isn't the birth of the baby immediately announced?

2. What does the law allow a husband to do to his wife if she bears three babies that fail inspection?

3. Why does David's Aunt Harriet bring her new baby to David's home?

4. How do David's mother and father react to Aunt Harriet's request?

5. What is Aunt Harriet's fate? Why did she choose this course of action?

6. David prays: "...God, let me be like other people. I don't want to be different." Why does he feel this way? What other groups in today's world face similar persecution?

7. Make a list of all the eight telepaths.

 

Discussion 7
The Chrysalids

Chapters 9-10

1. Who is the new telepath and how do the others become aware of her?

2. Why do some farming seasons have more deviations than others? (Concealment or weather?)

3. What is problematic about Anne marrying Alan? What is Uncle Axel's solution?

4. What difficulties are there for David and Rosalind to get married?

5. Who do you think shot and killed Alan with the arrow?

6. How does Anne's suicide almost result in the exposure of the group of telepaths?

Discussion 8
The Chrysalids

Chapter 11

1. What happens to Petra that prompts all seven of the telepaths to come to her aid?

2. Why is this gathering of the group dangerous to them?

3. Uncle Axel tells David that he killed Alan. Why did he kill him?

4. What does David agree to do to his little sister Petra if she is captured by the authorities? Why?

 

Discussion 9
The Chrysalids

Chapter 12

1. Why are David and Petra forced to suddenly flee their home in the middle of the night?

2. Why is David surprised that Rosalind's mother helped her daughter prepare to flee Waknuk?

3. Why does Rosalind kill the man that is tracking them?

4. As Katherine is tortured for information, how does the status of the runaways change?

5. Only Petra's strong telepathic powers can detect the others from a very long distance. Who are they?

 

Discussion 10
The Chrysalids

Chapter 13

1. Why do the New Zealanders promise that help is on the way?

2. Petra asks her brother, "Why did he say you must kill Rosalind and me?" What is the answer to her question?

3. How is telepathy different in New Zealand than in Labrador?

4. How do the New Zealand people feel about those from Labrador?

5. What happens to the runaways when they enter the Fringes country?

 

Discussion 11
The Chrysalids

Chapter 14

1. How has Rosalind's character been formed by the fact that she's a mutant living in an intolerant society?

2. David has been taught that the "Devil" rules in the Fringes, but the Fringes people think that the "Devil" rules where David is from. Explain how both statements are viewed by those who believe them.

3. As the New Zealand people get closer, Rosalind and David are able to communicate with them directly for the first time. What do they learn about the New Zealanders?

4. Who is the "spider-man" that David meets in the Fringes?

5. Why does David attack the "spider-man"?

 

Discussion 12
The Chrysalids

Chapters 15

1. David finds an old friend in the Fringes. Who is she?

2. Why can't Sophie have children?

3. What plans does Gordon, the "spider-man", have for Rosalind?

4. What options does she have in resisting Gordon's plans?

5. How does Sophie help David? Why does she do so?

 

Discussion 13
The Chrysalids

Chapter 16

1. The New Zealand woman says, "There was the power of gods in the hands of children...but were they mad children...? The mountains are cinders and the plains are black glass - still after centuries." What does she mean by this? Are people ultimately sane or insane?

2. What is particularly disturbing about David's and Petra's father being part of the hunting party?

3. According to the New Zealand woman, what is the fate for people like David's father Joseph? Why?

4. In the final battle, what is the fate of Joseph, Gordon, and Sophie?

5. How are Petra, Rosalind, and David saved?

 

Discussion 14
The Chrysalids

Chapter 17

1. What is the fate of all the non-telepaths in the Fringes area?

2. How does the New Zealand woman justify what has happened to all the non-telepaths?

3. Why does Michael stay behind?

4. Do you think the telepaths are a superior species of humanity?

5. Is the ending of the book positive or negative?

 

10 English
Seán's Class


Own Topic Journals

Length = 30 lines, full sentence and paragraph format, proofread.

You can write about any topic you want, but you must stay on that topic. That is, don’t wander from one topic to another. Instead, pick an issue and discuss it in two paragraphs.

Some students decide to write a poem or a short story and this is fine.

Other students have a hard time coming up with ideas. If you can’t think of a topic, you can choose from the list below:

1. Educational goals (3 paragraphs): What are your educational goals for this year? What might be some obstacles that may get in your way? What strategies can you use to overcome these obstacles?

2. The Best (3 paragraphs): The best movie you’ve seen. The best book you’ve read. The best music you’ve heard.

3. Controversial Issue (3 paragraphs): Pick an issue from the list below and present one side of the issue, the opposite view, and where you stand and why.
• Drugs
• War
• Abortion
• Capital Punishment
• Current issues: violence in schools, tasers, etc.
• Relationship Abuse
• “isms”: racism, sexism, classism, homophobia, etc.
• Native Rights


What I saw (or thought) on my way here today
The most important thing for me right now is ...
A dream (real or imaginary)
What would I do today with a) one hundred dollars b) one million dollars c) ten dollars
A most enjoyable day
A memorable person or an interesting character
What is the good life?
I don’t like ...
A favourite activity
I’m proud of myself because...
A wonderful day
My freedom is important to me
I worry about
A dream
What it is like to be old
A good friend
A false friend
A beautiful place
Money is a drug
My favourite part of Toronto
Doing the right thing
A very difficult person
Someone I admire
How children should be raised
How children should not be raised
What I want is ...
A season I like is ...
I (or we) shall overcome
One thing that makes me angry is ...
One thing that makes me happy is ...
Pets

The journal can describe your own life, dreams, or experiences. but does not have to. You can “make up “ responses to these ideas as if you were another person.

Quad 2 10 English Seán’s Class
Literature Response Topics
The Chrysalids

Please write 30 lines for any 5 of the topics below in complete sentence and paragraph form (2 paragraphs).

1. Contrast David’s morality with his father’s. Which do you agree with and why?

2. How does Joseph Strorm explain the fact that the only field with deviations in it belongs to Angus Morton? How do you explain it? What does this tell the reader about religions linking events to causes?

3. Do the “normal” people in the story have good reasons to destroy mutations? Do not just consider their religious beliefs; consider moral, scientific and practical reasons for or against systematic destruction of mutations.

4. Compare and contrast both the threat mutants present and the way they are treated in The Chrysalids and The X-Men.

5. You are a legal representative for Sally and Katherine after their capture. Write a one page statement in which you argue for their defence. You must try to prove that they do not deserve to be killed (or made infertile). You may also argue that they are not mutants, in order to bolster their defence. Use all arguments and evidence at your disposal. Remember that you are trying to convince a religious judge of their innocence.

6. Sophie's humiliating death at the side of the Spider-Man is the final statement of pathos (arousing pity, sorrow, sympathy) in a very pathetic life story. Explain the above statement and offer some examples to back up your comments.

7. Is The Chrysalids an anti-religious novel? Or, is the author simply making constructive observations about the balance of Christianity and Science? If there is a balance, how do we create this balance?

8. Write a short, additional chapter to the novel describing what life is like in New Zealand for David, Rosalind, and Petra.

 
Quad 2 10 English Seán’s Class

Essay Topics

The Chrysalids

Please answer one of the following questions in a well organized 5 paragraph essay. Length = Applied - 500 words. Academic - 750 words.

1. Although The Chrysalids takes place in the future, it was actually written to give people in our time a message. What are the 3 main messages of the novel and how do they relate to issues in our society?

2. Compare and contrast the societies from The Hunger Games and The Chrysalids.

3. What is the main political message of The Chrysalids?

4. Make up your own question, get it approved by Seán, start writing.

10 Academic English
Seán's Class

Own Book Report


Please write 2 pages (30 lines) in complete sentences and paragraphs.
Each question should be answered in one paragraph.

1. Compare and contrast the two main characters in the book.

2. Briefly, describe the plot of the story, especially the key events (write one paragraph only).

3. What is the moral of the story? In short, what message does the author want to give to you, the reader?

4. Give three reasons why you liked or disliked the book.

5. Make up your own question about the book and answer it. (The question and answer are both important.)

The Chrysalids

Characters


The Strorm Family


David Strorm: Hero of the novel; possesses a peculiar telepathic ability which causes the main conflict in the novel.

Joseph Strorm: David's father; champion of purity in all forms of life; leading figure in Waknuk.

Emily Strorm: David's mother; a pathetic woman who lives in the shadow of her husband.

Petra Strorm: David's younger sister; possesses awesome telepathic powers; causes the crisis of the novel and ultimate brings rescue.

Aunt Harriet: Emily's sister; gives birth to a slightly deviate infant and, after failing to conceal it, commits suicide with the baby.

Mary Strorm: David's older sister; somewhat sympathetic to him.

Uncle Axel: David's uncle; knows about David's ability; broad-minded and philosophical; acts as protector of David during the latter's youth; functions as mouthpiece to express the author's opinions.

Elias Strorm: David's grandfather; not part of the novel but was founder of the community of Waknuk, and largely responsible for its philosophy.

Spider Man: The older brother of Joseph Strorm; deprived of his rights as a boy because of deviational developments in his arms and legs; lives in the Fringes.

The Group


David

Petra

Michael: Eldest of the group; best educated; acts as leader and philosopher.

Rosalind Morton: David's half-cousin and sweetheart; flees with him to the Fringes.

Anne: Only member of the group to violate its solidarity; marries a "norm"; commits suicide.

Rachel: Anne's sister; loyal to the group.

Katherine: First to be discovered by Waknuk; under torture reveals David, Rosalind and Petra.

Sally: Neighbour of Katherine; captured with her.

Mark: Lives farthest from the group; along with Michael and Rachel, he is not discovered.

The Others


Sophie Wender: Childhood friend of David; discovered as a deviate and banished to the Fringes; most pathetic victim of Waknuk's philosophy.

The Wenders: Martie and Johnny, Sophie's parents; because they concealed Sophie, they, too, were banished.

Angus Morton: Rosalind's father; in constant feud with Joseph Strorm over deviations; seems to have more common sense than his enemy.

Old Jacob: Keeper at the Strorm farm; ultra conservative believer in Waknuk's religion.

Alan Ervin: Anne's husband; had reported Sophie Wender and planned to blackmail the members of the group; dies a violent death.

The Sealand Lady: Woman in distant civilization who communicates with Petra.

Jerome Skinner: Stranger to Waknuk, but partially responsible for discovery of some of the group.

The Inspector: Responsible for purity in Waknuk; carries authority of the government in Rigo; a reasonable man, but not intelligent enough to think his way past the limits of his job.

 

Contact School
COURSE  ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION  OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE:

Grade 10 Academic English

   COURSE CODE:

ENG2D

COURSE TYPE/GRADE:

Academic/10

 CREDIT VALUE:

1

PREREQUISITE:

Gr. 9 Academic or Applied English

DATE:

2018-2019

TEACHER NAME:

Seán Adams

PERIOD:

A and C

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

 

This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the selective use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. This course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 11 university or college prepara- tion course.

OVERALL CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS:

 

Oral Communication
1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety
of situations for a variety of purposes;
2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate
with different audiences for a variety of purposes;
3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers,
areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.

Reading and Literature Studies
1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of informational, literary,
and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;
2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements
and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;
3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;
4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for
improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.

Writing
1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write
for an intended purpose and audience;
2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational,
literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;
3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies,
and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work
effectively;
4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for
improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.
             

Media Studies

1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;
2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and
explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning;
3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences,
using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques;
4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters
and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding
and creating media texts.

                                   

ASSESSMENT:

Throughout the course, a range of instructional strategies will be used to address students’ needs.  Assessment is the onoing proces of gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources. Diagnostic assessments are used to identify students’ strengths and learning needs to assist with planning, modifying and adjusting instruction.  Formative assessments, which occur throughout the learning process, give students multiple opportunities to practice and receive feedback in an effort to improve their learning and achievement of the curriculum expectations.
EVALUATION:

Evaluation measures achievement of the overall curriculum expectations.  They are summative and usually take place at the end of important segments of learning (end of a unit, strand, term, semester), following student practice and constructive feedback.  Evaluations give students an opportunity to apply and demonstrate their learning based on established achievement criteria. 
Seventy per cent (70%) of the final grade will be based on the evaluations conducted during the course. There will be numerous and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four achievement categories according to the weighting described below.  Missed and/or incomplete assignments will have an impact on the final grade where there are a number of curriculum expectations that have not been evaluated because of missed assignments.
Thirty per cent (30%) of the final grade will be based on summative evaluation(s) administered towards the end of the course and following the same weighting of the achievement chart categories as the term evaluation.  All students must take part in the course-culminating activities that make up the 30% final evaluation mark. 

                                                                                                                       

WEIGHTING ACCORDING TO ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES:

 

Knowledge/Understanding

25

%

 Thinking

25

%

Communication

25

%

Application

25

%


LEARNING SKILLS:

There are six clusters of learning skills required for effective learning, achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success in and out of school: Responsibility, Independent Work, Organization, Initiative, Collaboration and Self-Regulation. 

LATE & MISSED ASSIGNMENTS:

Submitting course work on time is an important aspect of student learning and time management.  Students will be informed of due dates and ultimate deadlines, which is the last opportunity for students to submit an assignment for evaluation.  Late submissions will be reported as part of the learning skills on the report card and a variety of strategies will be used to encourage on-time submission of assignments including parent, student-teacher conferences, counselling, contracts, alternative assignments and extra help.  A mark deduction for late assignments up to and including the full value of the assignment may be used as a last resort.   

ACADEMIC HONESTY:  

Students are expected to be academically honest by submitting their own original work, and the marks they receive are intended to reflect their own academic achievement.  When evidence of dishonesty is confirmed, the incident and the consequences will be communicated to the principal/vice-principal, the student and parent(s)/guardian.

A mark of zero may be awarded for the assignment in question and a repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences.

COMMUNICATION:

 

Extra help will be available, including before classes, at lunch, and after school.                                                                
Phone calls home will be made regularly to discuss academics, attendance, punctuality or behaviour.
The teacher can be contacted at 416-393-1455.
Formal Parent/Teacher Meetings/Conferences will be twice a year. Upon request, meetings can be arranged at any time during the school year.

COURSE EVALUATION PLAN

 

30% Final Evaluations

EVALUATION TASKS

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

WEIGHTING (%)

 

Exam and Essay

 

K/U,  T, C, A

 

30

70% Course Work

 

UNIT SEQUENCE

TIMING
(Hrs or Dates)

EVALUATION TASK(S)

 

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

 

DUE DATE

 

Oral Communication

 

 

 

 

Each Quad
30 Hours

 

Literature and Media Oral Questions

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading and Literature Studies

 

Each Quad
30 Hours

Oral and Written Responses to Literature and Media

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing

 

Each Quad
30 Hours

Journals, Literature Responses, Reports, Essays, Media Responses, and Tests.

 

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly & End of Quad

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Media Studies

 

Each Quad
20 Hours

Article and Film Analyses

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact School
COURSE  ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION  OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE:

Grade 10 Applied English

   COURSE CODE:

ENG2P

COURSE TYPE/GRADE:

Applied/10

 CREDIT VALUE:

1

PREREQUISITE:

Gr. 9 Academic or Applied English

DATE:

2018-2019

TEACHER NAME:

Seán Adams

PERIOD:

A and C

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in secondary school and daily life. Students will study and create a variety of informational, literary, and graphic texts. An important focus will be on the consolidation of strategies and processes that help students interpret texts and communicate clearly and effectively. This course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 11 college or workplace preparation course.

OVERALL CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS:

 

Oral Communication
1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety
of situations for a variety of purposes;
2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate
with different audiences for a variety of purposes;
3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers,
areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.

Reading and Literature Studies
1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of informational, literary,
and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;
2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements
and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;
3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;
4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for
improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.

Writing
1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write
for an intended purpose and audience;
2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational,
literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;
3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies,
and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work
effectively;
4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for
improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.
                                                                                                                                                                                               

Text Box: Media Studies 1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts; 2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning; 3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences, using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques; 4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding and creating media texts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSESSMENT:

Throughout the course, a range of instructional strategies will be used to address students’ needs.  Assessment is the onoing proces of gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources. Diagnostic assessments are used to identify students’ strengths and learning needs to assist with planning, modifying and adjusting instruction.  Formative assessments, which occur throughout the learning process, give students multiple opportunities to practice and receive feedback in an effort to improve their learning and achievement of the curriculum expectations.
EVALUATION:

Evaluation measures achievement of the overall curriculum expectations.  They are summative and usually take place at the end of important segments of learning (end of a unit, strand, term, semester), following student practice and constructive feedback.  Evaluations give students an opportunity to apply and demonstrate their learning based on established achievement criteria. 
Seventy per cent (70%) of the final grade will be based on the evaluations conducted during the course. There will be numerous and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four achievement categories according to the weighting described below.  Missed and/or incomplete assignments will have an impact on the final grade where there are a number of curriculum expectations that have not been evaluated because of missed assignments.
Thirty per cent (30%) of the final grade will be based on summative evaluation(s) administered towards the end of the course and following the same weighting of the achievement chart categories as the term evaluation.  All students must take part in the course-culminating activities that make up the 30% final evaluation mark. 
                                                                                                                       

WEIGHTING ACCORDING TO ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES:

 

Knowledge/Understanding

25

%

 Thinking

25

%

Communication

25

%

Application

25

%


LEARNING SKILLS:

There are six clusters of learning skills required for effective learning, achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success in and out of school: Responsibility, Independent Work, Organization, Initiative, Collaboration and Self-Regulation. 

LATE & MISSED ASSIGNMENTS:

Submitting course work on time is an important aspect of student learning and time management.  Students will be informed of due dates and ultimate deadlines, which is the last opportunity for students to submit an assignment for evaluation.  Late submissions will be reported as part of the learning skills on the report card and a variety of strategies will be used to encourage on-time submission of assignments including parent, student-teacher conferences, counselling, contracts, alternative assignments and extra help.  A mark deduction for late assignments up to and including the full value of the assignment may be used as a last resort.   

ACADEMIC HONESTY:  

Students are expected to be academically honest by submitting their own original work, and the marks they receive are intended to reflect their own academic achievement.  When evidence of dishonesty is confirmed, the incident and the consequences will be communicated to the principal/vice-principal, the student and parent(s)/guardian.

A mark of zero may be awarded for the assignment in question and a repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences.

COMMUNICATION:

 

Extra help will be available, including before classes, at lunch, and after school.                                                               
Phone calls home will be made regularly to discuss academics, attendance, punctuality or behaviour.
The teacher can be contacted at 416-393-1455.
Formal Parent/Teacher Meetings/Conferences will be twice a year. Upon request, meetings can be arranged at any time during the school year.

COURSE EVALUATION PLAN

 

30% Final Evaluations

EVALUATION TASKS

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

WEIGHTING (%)

 

Exam and Essay

 

K/U,  T, C, A

 

30

70% Course Work

 

UNIT SEQUENCE

TIMING
(Hrs or Dates)

EVALUATION TASK(S)

 

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

 

DUE DATE

 

Oral Communication

 

 

 

 

Each Quad
30 Hours

 

Literature and Media Oral Questions

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading and Literature Studies

 

Each Quad
30 Hours

Oral and Written Responses to Literature and Media

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing

 

Each Quad
30 Hours

Journals, Literature Responses, Reports, Essays, Media Responses, and Tests.

 

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly & End of Quad

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Media Studies

 

Each Quad
20 Hours

Article and Film Analyses

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly