10 English Quad 3

The Catcher in the Rye

 

 

 

The Catcher in the Rye

Audio Book

 

Track 1

 

Track 2

 

Track 3

 

Track 4

 

Track 5

 

 

 

 

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Quad 3 Dates

 

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The Catcher in the Rye

Discussion Questions

 

Discussion 1

The Catcher in the Rye
Chapter 1

1. Where is the narrator as he begins to tell his story? What is the setting?

2. What does he mean when he calls his brother a prostitute?

3. How does he feel about his school?

4. Why does he get kicked out of school?

5. What kind of a school does he go to?

 

Discussion 2

The Catcher in the Rye
Chapter 2

1. How does Holden feel about old people like Spencer - his history teacher?

2. According to Holden, is life a game that you have to play by the rules?

3. Old Spencer asks Holden: “What’s the matter with you, boy?” What is the matter with him?

4. Why does Holden fail history class?

5. What does Holden mean when he calls people “phonies” and why doesn’t he like them?

6. Why can’t Spencer understand Holden?

 

Discussion 3

The Catcher in the Rye
Chapters 3-4

1. Describe what Ackley is like.

2. What does Holden think of Ackley?

3. What do you think Ackley thinks of Holden?

4. Why does Holden call Stradlater a "secret slob"?

5. What kind of a relationship does Holden have with Jane Gallagher?

6. Why is Holden nervous about Stradlater going on a date with Jane?

 

Discussion 4

The Catcher in the Rye
Chapters 5-6

1. Why do they serve steak on Saturdays at Pencey Prep?

2. Why does Holden hate movies?

3. Who is Allie? What was he like?

4. How does Holden react when Allie dies?

5. Holden suffers from anxiety. What is he anxious about at the beginning of chapter 6?

6. What aggravates Holden about Stradlater when he returns from his date with Jane?

7. Why does Holden attack Stradlater?

 


Discussion 5

The Catcher in the Rye
Chapters 7-8

1. Holden feels alienated from others. Why does he feel so lonely when he is surrounded by others in his school dormitory? Why does he wish he was dead?

2. Why does Holden start crying as he leaves Pencey Prep?

3. What does Holden lie about to Ernest Morrow's mom? Why?

4. Why does he say he has to have an operation to remove a brain tumour?

 

Discussion 6

The Catcher in the Rye
Chapters 9-10

1. What are Holden's rules for sex?

2. Why does he call Faith Cavendish so late at night?

3. Why doesn't Holden go to sleep for the night?

4. Who is Phoebe? What's she like?

5. Who is Jim Steele? What does he think of the women he meets in the club?

 

Discussion 7
The Catcher in the Rye
Chapters 11-12

1. We learn more about Jane's and Holden's relationship in this chapter. What was good about their time together?

2. How does his time with Jane that summer compare to how his life is going now?

3. Why does Holden keep wondering what happens to the ducks in the winter?

4. Even Horwitz, the taxi driver, wonders why Holden isn't home in bed. Why isn't he?

5. How is Holden an outsider in Ernie's Piano Bar?

6. What are some of the things that bother him about the people in the bar? Is he being hyper critical and judgemental?


Discussion 8
The Catcher in the Rye
Chapters 13-14

1. Holden says, "people are always ruining things for you". Why doesn't he like other people?

2. How is Holden feeling when he agrees to pay for a prostitute?

3. Why is Holden still a virgin? Why doesn't he have sex with Sunny?

4. Although Holden won't pray to God, he talks to his dead brother, Allie. Why?

5. Why won't Holden pay the extra $5 to Maurice?

6. Why is he suicidal?

 

Discussion 9

The Catcher in the Rye
Chapters 15-16

1. What do we find out about Holden’s parents in chapter 15?

2. Holden says “it’s really hard to be roommates with people if your suitcases are much better than theirs - if yours are really good ones and theirs aren’t”. What do you think he is talking about?

3. How is being of a different religion similar to owning suitcases of different value?

4. If Holden wouldn’t give the extra $5 to Maurice, then why does he give $10 to the nuns?

5. Why does Holden feel less depressed when he hears the young boy singing “If a body catch a body coming through the rye”?

Discussion 10

The Catcher in the Rye
Chapters 17-18

1. How does Holden feel about Sally Hayes?

2. Holden asks Sally “do you ever get fed up” and then goes on a rant about what he hates about people and society. What makes him fed up?

3. When Holden asks Sally to run away with him to the country, what is it he is running from?

4. We finally get to know exactly what it is about movies that Holden hates so much when he watches one at Radio City. What bothers him about movies?

 

Discussion 11
The Catcher in the Rye
Chapters 19-20

1. When Carl Luce meets Holden for a drink, he says “I refuse to answer any typical Holden Caulfield questions tonight. When in hell are you going to grow up?”. What is Carl talking about?

2. According to Holden, why does his sex life stink?

3. To what extent is Holden’s drinking a form of self-medication?

4. Holden cries for the third time when he is drunk. What prompts him to cry?


Discussion 12
The Catcher in the Rye
Chapters 21-22

1. Again, we find out a little bit about Holden’s mom when he sneaks into his family’s apartment. How do we know that she suffers from anxiety?

2. We also meet Phoebe for the first time. What’s she like?

3. Phoebe and Holden start talking about him getting kicked out of yet another school. What’s the problem with Holden and his education - is it him or is it the schools he goes to?

4. Phoebe says to Holden, “You don’t like anything that’s happening”, which pretty much sums up Holden’s attitude. Why is he negative about everything?

5. Who is James Castle and why does Holden start to think about him?

6. When Phoebe asks Holden what he would like to be, he replies, “I’d just be the catcher in the rye and all”. What does he mean by this?

 

Discussion 13
The Catcher in the Rye
Chapters 23-24

1. How does Phoebe feel when Holden starts to cry uncontrollably in her bedroom?

2. From Phoebe's point of view, what does she think is the matter with her brother?

3. Who is Mr. Antolini and what does Holden think of him?

4. Why does Holden start to feel physically ill (dizzy, headache, stomach ache)?

5. According to Mr. Antolini, Holden was not the first person to go through hard times. What does he say is causing Holden’s difficulties?

 

Discussion 14
The Catcher in the Rye
Chapters 25-26

1. Holden starts to have a physical and mental breakdown as he is walking in Manhatten. Describe it.

2. What upsets Holden about the “Fuck You” graffiti he finds in Phoebe’s school?

3. What does Holden plan to do after he says goodbye to Phoebe?

4. Why does he agree to stay in New York?

5. Where does Holden end up at the end of the story?

6. What needs to happen to Holden for him to get well?

 

 

10 English
Seán's Class


Own Topic Journals

Length = 30 lines, full sentence and paragraph format, proofread.

You can write about any topic you want, but you must stay on that topic. That is, don’t wander from one topic to another. Instead, pick an issue and discuss it in two paragraphs.

Some students decide to write a poem or a short story and this is fine.

Other students have a hard time coming up with ideas. If you can’t think of a topic, you can choose from the list below:

1. Educational goals (3 paragraphs): What are your educational goals for this year? What might be some obstacles that may get in your way? What strategies can you use to overcome these obstacles?

2. The Best (3 paragraphs): The best movie you’ve seen. The best book you’ve read. The best music you’ve heard.

3. Controversial Issue (3 paragraphs): Pick an issue from the list below and present one side of the issue, the opposite view, and where you stand and why.
• Drugs
• War
• Abortion
• Capital Punishment
• Current issues: violence in schools, tasers, etc.
• Relationship Abuse
• “isms”: racism, sexism, classism, homophobia, etc.
• Native Rights


What I saw (or thought) on my way here today
The most important thing for me right now is ...
A dream (real or imaginary)
What would I do today with a) one hundred dollars b) one million dollars c) ten dollars
A most enjoyable day
A memorable person or an interesting character
What is the good life?
I don’t like ...
A favourite activity
I’m proud of myself because...
A wonderful day
My freedom is important to me
I worry about
A dream
What it is like to be old
A good friend
A false friend
A beautiful place
Money is a drug
My favourite part of Toronto
Doing the right thing
A very difficult person
Someone I admire
How children should be raised
How children should not be raised
What I want is ...
A season I like is ...
I (or we) shall overcome
One thing that makes me angry is ...
One thing that makes me happy is ...
Pets

The journal can describe your own life, dreams, or experiences. but does not have to. You can “make up “ responses to these ideas as if you were another person.

Quad 3 10 English Seán’s Class
Literature Response Topics
The Catcher in the Rye

Please write 30 lines for each journal in complete sentence and paragraph form (2 paragraphs).

1. You are Holden Caulfield. Tell me what you think of Pencey Prep School and why you got expelled.

After you leave Pencey, you come to Contact. Tell me what you think of this place. Do you think you’ll make the rolls?

2. Explain, using examples from the novel, how Holden is an outsider.

Describe an experience you have had where you felt like an outsider.

3. Most people I know who’ve read The Catcher in the Rye feel that they’re similar to Holden Caulfield in one way or another. Write about some aspect of Holden’s personality or actions that remind you of yourself.

4. “The thing is, it’s really hard to be roommates with people if your suitcases are much better than theirs - if yours are really good ones and theirs aren’t.” (The Catcher in the Rye, p. 109.)

Is this statement true? In other words, is it harder to be friends with someone who is from a different social-economic class than you? You can use examples from you own life and /or the novel in answering this question.

5. What does Holden like and dislike about Sally Hayes?
What do you think she likes about him?

Quad 3 10 English Seán’s Class
Book Report: The Catcher in the Rye

4 Questions - 15-20 lines each - Total is 60-80 lines.
Please write in complete sentence and paragraph form.

1. Name three people that Holden meets and say what he thinks of each person. Is he right about these people?

2. What is the biggest problem that Holden has with Pencey Prep school?
What do you think should change - Holden’s attitude to education or Pencey school?

3. What message do you think J.D. Salinger is trying to give to readers? (What is the theme of the book?)

4. Give three reasons why you liked or disliked the book.


Quad 3 10 English Seán’s Class

Essay Topics


Please answer one of the following questions in a well organized 5 paragraph essay. Length = Applied - 500 words. Academic - 750 words.

1. Holden Caulfield is a phony. Discuss, feeling free to agree or disagree.

2. Holden Caulfield is essentially an immature, judgmental, and self-centred person. Discuss, feeling free to agree or disagree.

3. Holden does a hell of a lot of things in the 3 day period in which the novel takes place. What does he learn from his experiences?

4. What are Holden’s attitudes towards school? How are they different from Mr. Antolini’s? Who is right?

5. Holden is essentially a compassionate, kind, intelligent person. Discuss, feeling free to agree or disagree.

6. What is Holden running from/afraid of?

7. What is Holden’s attitude towards sex? What can you learn about his character from this attitude?

8. Make up your own question, get it approved by Seán, start writing.

 

10 Academic English
Seán's Class

Own Book Report


Please write 2 pages (30 lines) in complete sentences and paragraphs.
Each question should be answered in one paragraph.

1. Compare and contrast the two main characters in the book.

2. Briefly, describe the plot of the story, especially the key events (write one paragraph only).

3. What is the moral of the story? In short, what message does the author want to give to you, the reader?

4. Give three reasons why you liked or disliked the book.

5. Make up your own question about the book and answer it. (The question and answer are both important.)

Contact School
COURSE  ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION  OUTLINE

AOURSE TITLE:

Grade 10 Academic English

   COURSE CODE:

ENG2D

COURSE TYPE/GRADE:

Academic/10

 CREDIT VALUE:

1

PREREQUISITE:

Gr. 9 Academic or Applied English

DATE:

2018-2019

TEACHER NAME:

Seán Adams

PERIOD:

A and C

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

 

This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the selective use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. This course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 11 university or college prepara- tion course.

OVERALL CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS:

 

Oral Communication
1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety
of situations for a variety of purposes;
2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate
with different audiences for a variety of purposes;
3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers,
areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.

Reading and Literature Studies
1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of informational, literary,
and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;
2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements
and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;
3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;
4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for
improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.

Writing
1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write
for an intended purpose and audience;
2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational,
literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;
3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies,
and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work
effectively;
4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for
improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.
             

Media Studies

1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;
2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and
explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning;
3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences,
using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques;
4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters
and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding
and creating media texts.

ASSESSMENT:

Throughout the course, a range of instructional strategies will be used to address students’ needs.  Assessment is the onoing proces of gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources. Diagnostic assessments are used to identify students’ strengths and learning needs to assist with planning, modifying and adjusting instruction.  Formative assessments, which occur throughout the learning process, give students multiple opportunities to practice and receive feedback in an effort to improve their learning and achievement of the curriculum expectations.
EVALUATION:

Evaluation measures achievement of the overall curriculum expectations.  They are summative and usually take place at the end of important segments of learning (end of a unit, strand, term, semester), following student practice and constructive feedback.  Evaluations give students an opportunity to apply and demonstrate their learning based on established achievement criteria. 
Seventy per cent (70%) of the final grade will be based on the evaluations conducted during the course. There will be numerous and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four achievement categories according to the weighting described below.  Missed and/or incomplete assignments will have an impact on the final grade where there are a number of curriculum expectations that have not been evaluated because of missed assignments.
Thirty per cent (30%) of the final grade will be based on summative evaluation(s) administered towards the end of the course and following the same weighting of the achievement chart categories as the term evaluation.  All students must take part in the course-culminating activities that make up the 30% final evaluation mark. 

                                                                                                                       

WEIGHTING ACCORDING TO ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES:

 

Knowledge/Understanding

25

%

 Thinking

25

%

Communication

25

%

Application

25

%


LEARNING SKILLS:

There are six clusters of learning skills required for effective learning, achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success in and out of school: Responsibility, Independent Work, Organization, Initiative, Collaboration and Self-Regulation. 

LATE & MISSED ASSIGNMENTS:

Submitting course work on time is an important aspect of student learning and time management.  Students will be informed of due dates and ultimate deadlines, which is the last opportunity for students to submit an assignment for evaluation.  Late submissions will be reported as part of the learning skills on the report card and a variety of strategies will be used to encourage on-time submission of assignments including parent, student-teacher conferences, counselling, contracts, alternative assignments and extra help.  A mark deduction for late assignments up to and including the full value of the assignment may be used as a last resort.   

ACADEMIC HONESTY:  

Students are expected to be academically honest by submitting their own original work, and the marks they receive are intended to reflect their own academic achievement.  When evidence of dishonesty is confirmed, the incident and the consequences will be communicated to the principal/vice-principal, the student and parent(s)/guardian.

A mark of zero may be awarded for the assignment in question and a repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences.

COMMUNICATION:

 

Extra help will be available, including before classes, at lunch, and after school.                                                                
Phone calls home will be made regularly to discuss academics, attendance, punctuality or behaviour.
The teacher can be contacted at 416-393-1455.
Formal Parent/Teacher Meetings/Conferences will be twice a year. Upon request, meetings can be arranged at any time during the school year.

COURSE EVALUATION PLAN

 

30% Final Evaluations

EVALUATION TASKS

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

WEIGHTING (%)

 

Exam and Essay

 

K/U,  T, C, A

 

30

70% Course Work

 

UNIT SEQUENCE

TIMING
(Hrs or Dates)

EVALUATION TASK(S)

 

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

 

DUE DATE

 

Oral Communication

 

 

 

 

Each Quad
30 Hours

 

Literature and Media Oral Questions

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading and Literature Studies

 

Each Quad
30 Hours

Oral and Written Responses to Literature and Media

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing

 

Each Quad
30 Hours

Journals, Literature Responses, Reports, Essays, Media Responses, and Tests.

 

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly & End of Quad

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Media Studies

 

Each Quad
20 Hours

Article and Film Analyses

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact School
COURSE  ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION  OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE:

Grade 10 Applied English

   COURSE CODE:

ENG2P

COURSE TYPE/GRADE:

Applied/10

 CREDIT VALUE:

1

PREREQUISITE:

Gr. 9 Academic or Applied English

DATE:

2018-2019

TEACHER NAME:

Seán Adams

PERIOD:

A and C

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in secondary school and daily life. Students will study and create a variety of informational, literary, and graphic texts. An important focus will be on the consolidation of strategies and processes that help students interpret texts and communicate clearly and effectively. This course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 11 college or workplace preparation course.

OVERALL CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS:

 

Oral Communication
1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety
of situations for a variety of purposes;
2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate
with different audiences for a variety of purposes;
3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers,
areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.

Reading and Literature Studies
1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of informational, literary,
and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;
2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements
and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;
3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;
4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for
improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.

Writing
1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write
for an intended purpose and audience;
2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational,
literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;
3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies,
and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work
effectively;
4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for
improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.
                                                                                                                                                                                               

Media Studies

1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;
2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and
explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning;
3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences,
using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques;
4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters
and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding
and creating media texts.

ASSESSMENT:

Throughout the course, a range of instructional strategies will be used to address students’ needs.  Assessment is the onoing proces of gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources. Diagnostic assessments are used to identify students’ strengths and learning needs to assist with planning, modifying and adjusting instruction.  Formative assessments, which occur throughout the learning process, give students multiple opportunities to practice and receive feedback in an effort to improve their learning and achievement of the curriculum expectations.
EVALUATION:

Evaluation measures achievement of the overall curriculum expectations.  They are summative and usually take place at the end of important segments of learning (end of a unit, strand, term, semester), following student practice and constructive feedback.  Evaluations give students an opportunity to apply and demonstrate their learning based on established achievement criteria. 
Seventy per cent (70%) of the final grade will be based on the evaluations conducted during the course. There will be numerous and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four achievement categories according to the weighting described below.  Missed and/or incomplete assignments will have an impact on the final grade where there are a number of curriculum expectations that have not been evaluated because of missed assignments.
Thirty per cent (30%) of the final grade will be based on summative evaluation(s) administered towards the end of the course and following the same weighting of the achievement chart categories as the term evaluation.  All students must take part in the course-culminating activities that make up the 30% final evaluation mark. 
                                                                                                                       

WEIGHTING ACCORDING TO ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES:

 

Knowledge/Understanding

25

%

 Thinking

25

%

Communication

25

%

Application

25

%


LEARNING SKILLS:

There are six clusters of learning skills required for effective learning, achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success in and out of school: Responsibility, Independent Work, Organization, Initiative, Collaboration and Self-Regulation. 

LATE & MISSED ASSIGNMENTS:

Submitting course work on time is an important aspect of student learning and time management.  Students will be informed of due dates and ultimate deadlines, which is the last opportunity for students to submit an assignment for evaluation.  Late submissions will be reported as part of the learning skills on the report card and a variety of strategies will be used to encourage on-time submission of assignments including parent, student-teacher conferences, counselling, contracts, alternative assignments and extra help.  A mark deduction for late assignments up to and including the full value of the assignment may be used as a last resort.   

ACADEMIC HONESTY:  

Students are expected to be academically honest by submitting their own original work, and the marks they receive are intended to reflect their own academic achievement.  When evidence of dishonesty is confirmed, the incident and the consequences will be communicated to the principal/vice-principal, the student and parent(s)/guardian.

A mark of zero may be awarded for the assignment in question and a repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences.

COMMUNICATION:

 

Extra help will be available, including before classes, at lunch, and after school.                                                               
Phone calls home will be made regularly to discuss academics, attendance, punctuality or behaviour.
The teacher can be contacted at 416-393-1455.
Formal Parent/Teacher Meetings/Conferences will be twice a year. Upon request, meetings can be arranged at any time during the school year.

COURSE EVALUATION PLAN

 

30% Final Evaluations

EVALUATION TASKS

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

WEIGHTING (%)

 

Exam and Essay

 

K/U,  T, C, A

 

30

70% Course Work

 

UNIT SEQUENCE

TIMING
(Hrs or Dates)

EVALUATION TASK(S)

 

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

 

DUE DATE

 

Oral Communication

 

 

 

 

Each Quad
30 Hours

 

Literature and Media Oral Questions

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading and Literature Studies

 

Each Quad
30 Hours

Oral and Written Responses to Literature and Media

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing

 

Each Quad
30 Hours

Journals, Literature Responses, Reports, Essays, Media Responses, and Tests.

 

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly & End of Quad

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Media Studies

 

Each Quad
20 Hours

Article and Film Analyses

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly