11/12 College English

 

 

 

 

 

Quad 1 Dates

 

 

The Snapper

By Roddy Doyle

Irish slang terms used in the book.

1. Snapper - a baby.

2. Wha' - what. Used at the end of sentences similar to the way Canadians say "eh" a lot.

3. Jacks - toilet.

4. Crack - fun; a good time. From the Irish word "craic".

5. Eejit - idiot.

6. Penno - in soccer, a penalty kick.

7. Scarleh - scarlet, meaning going very red with embarrassment.

8. Whingin' - whining.

9. Arse bandit - gay man.

10. Bob - money, a slang term for a shilling, an old form of currency.

11. TD - a member of the Irish Parliament, from the Irish words "Teachta Dála"

12. Shower - a group of people.

13. Brasser - sex trade worker.

14. S.W.A.L.K. - short for "Sealed With A Loving Kiss".

15. Box his ears - smack him in the head.

16. Giving out - getting angry.

17. Camogie - a female sport in Ireland known as hurling, Ireland's national sport.

18. Guards - police.

19. Bollix - balls, as in testicles, used to put someone down (you stupid bollix) or to say "no way" (me bollix).

 

Discussion 1
The Snapper

P. 1-27

1. What does the title of the novel mean?

2. Who are the following characters?
a) Jimmy Sr.
b) Veronica
c) Sharon
d) Jimmy Jr.
e) Les
f) Darren
g) Tracy
h) Linda
i) Burgess
j) Jackie
k) Mary
l) Yvonne

3. Why is it shocking that Sharon is pregnant?

4. How do Jimmy Sr. and Veronica react?

5. Why won't Sharon reveal who the father is? Does she want to have a baby?

6. Explain how getting a puppy is foreshadowing in the novel.

7. Describe what the Rabbitte family is like.

Discussion 2
The Snapper

P. 27-58

1. How is Sharon coping with her pregnancy?

2. Cite a funny scene from the book.

3. Describe the circumstances the night that Sharon got pregnant. Was she raped?

4. Should the twins be told that what Sharon did was wrong?

5. How do Sharon's friends react when she tells them that she is pregnant?

6. Who is the father?

Discussion 3
The Snapper

P. 58-84

1. How do Jimmy Sr.'s friends react to the news that Sharon is going to have a baby?

2. Why doesn't Sharon care what people will say about her pregnancy now that the news has got out?

3. What is significant about the scene where Jimmy Sr. says he likes the look of the tennis player on TV and then finds out she's only 17 years old?

4. What does Bimbo say that he overheard Burgess telling his friends? How does Jimmy Sr. react?

5. How does Sharon react when Jimmy Sr. tells her what Burgess said about her?

Discussion 4
The Snapper

P. 84-109

1. What does Sharon's confrontation with Burgess reveal about his character?

2. How does Sharon feel about the outcome of the confrontation?

3. Describe the confrontation between Jimmy Sr. and Burgess in the washroom.

4. Why does everyone find it funny that Burgess runs away from home?

5. How does Sharon feel about Burgess running away from home?

 

Discussion 5
The Snapper

P. 109-135

1. What's the connection between the discussion of child abuse and George Burgess?

2. Why does Sharon call Burgess a "fuckin' eejit" after reading his letter?

3. After Doris Burgess reads the letter from her husband, how does she know that the father of Sharon's baby is George?

4. According to Doris, what is the problem with middle aged men?

5. When talking to Jackie, who does Sharon say is the father of her child?

6. How do the following people react to Sharon's story about the Spanish sailor?
a) Jackie, Mary, Yvonne
b) Jimmy Sr. And Veronica
c) Youth in her neighbourhood
d) Tracy and Linda
e) Jimmy Sr.'s friends

7. Describe the conversation between Sharon and Burgess after Sharon leaves work.

 

Discussion 6
The Snapper

P. 135-164

1. How does Jimmy Jr. support Sharon?

2. What is the main reason the Spanish sailor story is suspect?

3. How does Jimmy Sr. get a bloody nose?

4. What is the real reason for Jimmy Sr.'s moody, sulky behaviour?

5. Why does Sharon say that she is moving out of her family home?

6. What finally breaks the logjam in the standoff between Sharon and Jimmy Sr.?

 

Discussion 7
The Snapper

P. 164-190

1. What book does Jimmy Sr. get out of the library?

2. What does he learn from the book?

3. As Sharon enters her ninth month of pregnancy, she realizes who the father is does not matter. What is the most important thing for her baby?

4. Why does Jimmy Sr. volunteer to be the coach of Darren's cycling club?

5. In what ways does Jimmy Sr. become involved in Sharon's pregnancy?

 

Discussion 8
The Snapper

P. 190-216

1. Why does Sharon quit her job?

2. How is Jimmy Sr. a "changed man".

3. Why isn't Jimmy Sr. interested in beating up Burgess?

4. Jimmy Sr. says, "Times have changed, d'yeh know tha' ". What does he mean by this?

5. Jimmy Sr. says, "We're some family all the same, wha' ". What does he mean by this?

6. Why is Sharon laughing in the hospital bed after she gives birth?

 

The Snapper

Notes
Describe the Rabbitte family
Assess: dysfunctional, personal echoes, love, language used
New dog in family
p. 46 Sharon tells family -middle of fight
How do ma & da take the news?
p. 48-49 Was it wrong?
p. 52 Sharon tells friends
p. 63 Jimmy tells friends
p. 78 Bimbo tells Jimmy Sr. what Burgess said
p. 81 Jimmy Sr. asks Sharon about Burgess
p. 84-92 Sharon confronts Burgess
p. 95 Jimmy Sr. confronts Burgess in washroom
p. 103 Burgess runs away from home
p. 111-112 Sharon gets letter from Burgess
p. 116 Doris receives letter from Burgess
p. 118 Doris visits Veronica
p. 119 Sharon trapped
p. 120 Jimmy Sr.'s and Veronica's reaction
p. 122 Sharon tells Jackie it was Spanish sailor
p. 125 Tortured parents
p. 125 Sharon sexually harassed # 1
p. 126 Jimmy Sr. tells friends at pub
p. 126-130 Burgess sees Sharon after work
p. 130 Sharon sexually harassed # 2
p. 131 Yvonne's reaction & p. 142
p. 131 Jimmy Sr. confronts Sharon re: Sailor
p. 132 Veronica asks: Does it matter?
p. 134 Jimmy Sr.'s friends support him
p. 135 Sharon's assessment
p. 138-141 Jimmy Jr. talks to Sharon about Burgess
p. 142 Jackie and Sharon talking about Yvonne & Sailor story
p. 143-148 Jimmy Sr. comes in with bloody nose
p. 148 Jimmy Sr. is ashamed of Sharon
p. 149 & 152 Jimmy Sr. gets "moody"
p. 151 Sharon: what to do about Jimmy Sr.'s moods
p. 155-158 Sharon tells Jimmy Sr. she's leaving: reconciliation begins
p. 158-164 Jimmy Sr. tells Sharon not to leave: reconciliation complete
p. 170 Jimmy Sr. reading Everywoman
p. 171, 173 Book questions
p. 175 Jimmy Sr. tries oral sex
p. 182 Burgess comes back
p. 185 Sharon runs into Yvonne & Mary at store
p. 197 Jimmy Sr. cutting grass sees Burgess
p. 201 Jimmy Sr.: times have changed for fathers
p. 202-208 Jackie & Sharon in pub for last time, meet Mary
p. 211 Family pride and Labour starts
p. 214 Phone call at home
p. 215 Naming her Georgina
p. 216 Laughing

 

 

 

11/12 College English
Seán's Class


Own Topic Journals

Length = 45 lines, full sentence and paragraph format, proofread.

You can write about any topic you want, but you must stay on that topic. That is, don’t wander from one topic to another. Instead, pick an issue and discuss it in two paragraphs.

Some students decide to write a poem or a short story and this is fine.

Other students have a hard time coming up with ideas. If you can’t think of a topic, you can choose from the list below:

1. Educational goals (3 paragraphs): What are your educational goals for this year? What might be some obstacles that may get in your way? What strategies can you use to overcome these obstacles?

2. The Best (3 paragraphs): The best movie you’ve seen. The best book you’ve read. The best music you’ve heard.

3. Controversial Issue (3 paragraphs): Pick an issue from the list below and present one side of the issue, the opposite view, and where you stand and why.
• Drugs
• War
• Abortion
• Capital Punishment
• Current issues: violence in schools, tasers, etc.
• Relationship Abuse
• “isms”: racism, sexism, classism, homophobia, etc.
• Native Rights


What I saw (or thought) on my way here today
The most important thing for me right now is ...
A dream (real or imaginary)
What would I do today with a) one hundred dollars b) one million dollars c) ten dollars
A most enjoyable day
A memorable person or an interesting character
What is the good life?
I don’t like ...
A favourite activity
I’m proud of myself because...
A wonderful day
My freedom is important to me
I worry about
A dream
What it is like to be old
A good friend
A false friend
A beautiful place
Money is a drug
My favourite part of Toronto
Doing the right thing
A very difficult person
Someone I admire
How children should be raised
How children should not be raised
What I want is ...
A season I like is ...
I (or we) shall overcome
One thing that makes me angry is ...
One thing that makes me happy is ...
Pets

The journal can describe your own life, dreams, or experiences. but does not have to. You can “make up “ responses to these ideas as if you were another person.

 

 

Senior English
Seán's Class
Literature Response Topics

Please answer 3 of the topics from below
Each response should be 45 lines long (1.5 pages)

1. Tell me about the Rabbitte family. Assess the family dynamics and tell me what you think of them.

2. Write a journal as if you are a character from the novel. You can be Sharon, Jimmy Sr., Veronica, or anyone else. Tell me what your views are regarding Sharon's pregnancy. Be creative and write in depth about "your" situation, "your" feelings about it, and "your" potential future.

3. Pick a scene from the novel and explain how it contributes to the story, theme or character development. (Please indicate the page numbers of your scene.)

4. Evaluate Sharon's character and comment on the choices she had and the choices she made.

“The Commitments” Film Review

Please answer each question in complete sentences.

1. Think back to the opening few minutes of the film. In that five minutes we are introduced to the main character, Jimmy Rabbitte, but we are also introduced to the city of Dublin. It is not a typical picture postcard view that we are given but something quite different.
a) From what you see on the screen what city did you think you were seeing at the start of the film?
b) What impression did you gain of the city from what you were shown? And the types of people in it?
Why do you think the director of the film decided to open the film in this way?

2. Here are the band members:
JIMMY
NATALIE
DEAN
OUTS PAN
BERNIE
IMELDA
STEVEN
DEREK
JOEY ‘THE LIPS’
DECO
BILLY
MICKAH

a)Which characters struck you as the most sympathetic and why?
b)Which characters did you not warm to and why?

3. Is it important whether the band succeeds or fails?

4. Is the film ultimately inspiring or depressing?

5. What is the message of “The Commitments”?


 

“The Van” Film Review

Please answer each question in complete sentences.

Who is your favorite character in the film? And why?

Describe Jimmy Sr.'s relationship with his children; with young people in general.

How does the film shed light on the nature of friendship?

How does the film illuminate issues involving marriage?

While this novel deals with serious themes, many people have found it wildly humorous. Discuss, using specific examples from the text.

“The Snapper” Film Review
(Novel-Film Comparison)

Please write in complete sentences and paragraphs and write 60 lines (15 lines per question).

1. Choose one character from the novel/film and discuss how each medium presents that character.

2. Pick a scene from the film that you think worked really well and explain why it was so good. (What did it add to the story, its themes or characters?)

3. Did you find that the film watered down or minimized a serious issue from the novel? Explain.

4. In the film, some changes are made in the plot. Evaluate two of these changes.

Senior English
Seán’s Class

Gr. 11 Only

Persuasive Essay Topics

Answer ONE of the following questions in an organized essay.

Length = 1,000-1,200 words.

1. Considering the Rabbits, examine the power of a family in overcoming adversity

2. Discuss how the main characters the novel deal with hardship as they encounter it in their lives. What lessons did you learn from their examples?

3. Consider the father-daughter relationship from The Snapper. Examine the relationship’s strengths, weaknesses, and growth throughout the novel.

4. Make up your own topic, discuss it with Seán, start writing.

NOTES:
1. Always use specific details from the novel to back up your views.
2. Underline or italicize the book title.
3. When you quote from the text, it is sufficient for this term paper to put the page number in brackets at the end of your sentence. Example: (p. 214).

e
 
Gr. 12 English Independent Study Unit Seán’s Class

Exploratory Reading:
1.Primary Sources:
* A minimum of two full length books or the equivalent should be read.
*At least one should be a novel. You may also read plays, poetry collections, articles, non-fiction books, biography/autobiography, etc.
* While reading, you should be considering an idea to shape into a thesis
for your essay.

2. Secondary Sources:
* These are readings about your books. A minimum of three items must be consulted.
*An important guideline: your own ideas before the critics.

3. Notes on your books:
Submit brief notes about the following topics for each of your books:
a) Main characters
b) Plot
c) Themes/Issues

Time Management
* Come prepared for conferences with work in progress and with specific proposals and questions for the teacher.
* Use class time productively.

Paper
* All steps of the writing process will be followed and submitted with the paper to be evaluated.
* See “ISU Checklist” sheet for those details.
* Length: College Level = 1200 words
University Level = 1500-2000 words.

Evaluation

Exploratory Reading, Log, Notes = 5 marks

Thesis, Plan, Draft = 5 marks

Essay = 20 marks

Total = 30 marks

 

Contact School

COURSE  ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION  OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE:

Grade 11 College English

   COURSE CODE:

ENG3C

COURSE TYPE/GRADE:

College/11

 CREDIT VALUE:

1

PREREQUISITE:

Gr. 10 Applied English

DATE:

2018-2019

TEACHER NAME:

Seán Adams

PERIOD:

C & B

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and

creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will

analyse challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well

as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts

in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and

clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course

is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college

preparation course.

 

OVERALL CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS:

Oral Communication

1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety

of situations for a variety of purposes;

2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate

with different audiences for a variety of purposes;

3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers,

areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.

Reading and Literature Studies

1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of informational, literary,

and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;

2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements

and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;

3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.

Writing

1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write

for an intended purpose and audience;

2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational,

literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;

3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies,

and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work

effectively;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.

                                                                                                                                                                                               

Media Studies

1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;

2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and

explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning;

3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences,

using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters

and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding

and creating media texts.

 

ASSESSMENT:

Throughout the course, a range of instructional strategies will be used to address students’ needs.  Assessment is the onoing proces of gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources. Diagnostic assessments are used to identify students’ strengths and learning needs to assist with planning, modifying and adjusting instruction.  Formative assessments, which occur throughout the learning process, give students multiple opportunities to practice and receive feedback in an effort to improve their learning and achievement of the curriculum expectations.

EVALUATION:

Evaluation measures achievement of the overall curriculum expectations.  They are summative and usually take place at the end of important segments of learning (end of a unit, strand, term, semester), following student practice and constructive feedback.  Evaluations give students an opportunity to apply and demonstrate their learning based on established achievement criteria. 

Seventy per cent (70%) of the final grade will be based on the evaluations conducted during the course. There will be numerous and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four achievement categories according to the weighting described below.  Missed and/or incomplete assignments will have an impact on the final grade where there are a number of curriculum expectations that have not been evaluated because of missed assignments.

Thirty per cent (30%) of the final grade will be based on summative evaluation(s) administered towards the end of the course and following the same weighting of the achievement chart categories as the term evaluation.  All students must take part in the course-culminating activities that make up the 30% final evaluation mark. 

                                                                                                                       

WEIGHTING ACCORDING TO ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES:

Knowledge/Understanding

25

%

 Thinking

25

%

Communication

25

%

Application

25

%

LEARNING SKILLS:

There are six clusters of learning skills required for effective learning, achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success in and out of school: Responsibility, Independent Work, Organization, Initiative, Collaboration and Self-Regulation. 

LATE & MISSED ASSIGNMENTS:

Submitting course work on time is an important aspect of student learning and time management.  Students will be informed of due dates and ultimate deadlines, which is the last opportunity for students to submit an assignment for evaluation.  Late submissions will be reported as part of the learning skills on the report card and a variety of strategies will be used to encourage on-time submission of assignments including parent, student-teacher conferences, counselling, contracts, alternative assignments and extra help.  A mark deduction for late assignments up to and including the full value of the assignment may be used as a last resort.   

ACADEMIC HONESTY:  

Students are expected to be academically honest by submitting their own original work, and the marks they receive are intended to reflect their own academic achievement.  When evidence of dishonesty is confirmed, the incident and the consequences will be communicated to the principal/vice-principal, the student and parent(s)/guardian.

A mark of zero may be awarded for the assignment in question and a repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences.

COMMUNICATION:

Extra help will be available, including before classes, at lunch, and after school.                                                                

Phone calls home will be made regularly to discuss academics, attendance, punctuality or behaviour.

The teacher can be contacted at 416-393-1455.

Formal Parent/Teacher Meetings/Conferences will be twice a year. Upon request, meetings can be arranged at any time during the school year.

COURSE EVALUATION PLAN

30% Final Evaluations

EVALUATION TASKS

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

WEIGHTING (%)

Exams

K/U,  T, C, A

30

70% Course Work

UNIT SEQUENCE

TIMING

(Hrs or Dates)

EVALUATION TASK(S)

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

DUE DATE

Oral Communication

Each Quad

30 Hours

Literature and Media Oral Questions

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Reading and Literature Studies

Each Quad

30 Hours

Oral and Written Responses to Literature and Media

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Writing

Each Quad

30 Hours

Journals, Literature Responses, Reports, Essays, Media Responses, and Tests.

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly & End of Quad

Media Studies

Each Quad

20 Hours

Article and Film Analyses

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

 

Contact School

COURSE  ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION  OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE:

Grade 12 College English

   COURSE CODE:

ENG4C

COURSE TYPE/GRADE:

College/12

 CREDIT VALUE:

1

PREREQUISITE:

Gr. 11 College English

DATE:

2018-2019

TEACHER NAME:

Seán Adams

PERIOD:

C & B

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OVERALL CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS:

Oral Communication

1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety

of situations for a variety of purposes;

2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate

with different audiences for a variety of purposes;

3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers,

areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.

Reading and Literature Studies

1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of informational, literary,

and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;

2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements

and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;

3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.

Writing

1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write

for an intended purpose and audience;

2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational,

literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;

3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies,

and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work

effectively;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.

 

Media Studies

1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;

2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning;

3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding and creating media texts.


ASSESSMENT:

Throughout the course, a range of instructional strategies will be used to address students’ needs.  Assessment is the onoing proces of gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources. Diagnostic assessments are used to identify students’ strengths and learning needs to assist with planning, modifying and adjusting instruction.  Formative assessments, which occur throughout the learning process, give students multiple opportunities to practice and receive feedback in an effort to improve their learning and achievement of the curriculum expectations.

EVALUATION:

Evaluation measures achievement of the overall curriculum expectations.  They are summative and usually take place at the end of important segments of learning (end of a unit, strand, term, semester), following student practice and constructive feedback.  Evaluations give students an opportunity to apply and demonstrate their learning based on established achievement criteria. 

Seventy per cent (70%) of the final grade will be based on the evaluations conducted during the course. There will be numerous and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four achievement categories according to the weighting described below.  Missed and/or incomplete assignments will have an impact on the final grade where there are a number of curriculum expectations that have not been evaluated because of missed assignments.

Thirty per cent (30%) of the final grade will be based on summative evaluation(s) administered towards the end of the course and following the same weighting of the achievement chart categories as the term evaluation.  All students must take part in the course-culminating activities that make up the 30% final evaluation mark. 

                                                                                                                       

WEIGHTING ACCORDING TO ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES:

Knowledge/Understanding

25

%

 Thinking

25

%

Communication

25

%

Application

25

%


LEARNING SKILLS:

There are six clusters of learning skills required for effective learning, achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success in and out of school: Responsibility, Independent Work, Organization, Initiative, Collaboration and Self-Regulation. 

LATE & MISSED ASSIGNMENTS:

Submitting course work on time is an important aspect of student learning and time management.  Students will be informed of due dates and ultimate deadlines, which is the last opportunity for students to submit an assignment for evaluation.  Late submissions will be reported as part of the learning skills on the report card and a variety of strategies will be used to encourage on-time submission of assignments including parent, student-teacher conferences, counselling, contracts, alternative assignments and extra help.  A mark deduction for late assignments up to and including the full value of the assignment may be used as a last resort.   

ACADEMIC HONESTY:  

Students are expected to be academically honest by submitting their own original work, and the marks they receive are intended to reflect their own academic achievement.  When evidence of dishonesty is confirmed, the incident and the consequences will be communicated to the principal/vice-principal, the student and parent(s)/guardian.

A mark of zero may be awarded for the assignment in question and a repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences.

COMMUNICATION:

 

Extra help will be available, including before classes, at lunch, and after school.                                                               

Phone calls home will be made regularly to discuss academics, attendance, punctuality or behaviour.

The teacher can be contacted at 416-393-1455.

Formal Parent/Teacher Meetings/Conferences will be twice a year. Upon request, meetings can be arranged at any time during the school year.

 

COURSE EVALUATION PLAN

30% Final Evaluations

EVALUATION TASKS

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

WEIGHTING (%)

Exams

K/U,  T, C, A

30

70% Course Work

UNIT SEQUENCE

TIMING

(Hrs or Dates)

EVALUATION TASK(S)

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

DUE DATE

Oral Communication

Each Quad

30 Hours

Literature and Media Oral Questions

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Reading and Literature Studies

Each Quad

30 Hours

Oral and Written Responses to Literature and Media

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Writing

Each Quad

30 Hours

Journals, Literature Responses, Reports, Essays, Media Responses, and Tests.

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly & End of Quad

Media Studies

Each Quad

20 Hours

Article and Film Analyses

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly