11/12 College English

Quad 2

 

 

 

 

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Discussion 1

The Stories of Eva Luna
Stories 1 & 2

“Two Words”

1. What does “Belisa Crepusculario” mean?

2. Describe her background and how she makes a living.

3. Why does Belisa believe that the Colonel was “the lonliest man in the world”?

4. Is Belisa attracted to the Colonel?

5. What do you think are the two words?

 

“Our Secret”

1. Why does this story start with a huge run-on sentence?

2. Where are the woman and man from?

3. What happens when they try to make love?

4. What is the trauma that he has experienced that prevents him from being intimate?

5. What secret do they share?

 

 

Discussion 2

The Stories of Eva Luna
Stories 3 & 4

“The Gold of Tomás Vargas”

1. Where does this story take place?

2. Describe Tomás Vargas’ character.

3. Who are Antonia Sierra and Concha Diaz? How does their relationship change throughout the story?

4. What is Vargas’ fate?

5. Whose money did Antonia and Concha use to buy the livestock and clothes, and to start up their cookery business?

 

“If You Touched My Heart”

1. Tell me about Amadeo Peralta’s background and behaviour.

2. Tell me about Hortensia’s background and fate.

3. What changed in society to allow for rich and powerful men like Peralta to become accountable to the law.

4. How have the roles reversed for Hortensia and Peralta?

5. What does the title have to do with the story?

 

Discussion 3

The Stories of Eva Luna
Stories 5 & 6

“Walimai”

1. In Walimai’s culture, how is the speaking of names regarded?

2. What happens to his people if they leave the jungle?

3. What does Walimai mean when he says, “She opened her eyes, and stared at me a long time. I understood”?

4. How do we know Walimai did what the Ila woman wanted?

5. Explain what Walimai learned when he says “sometimes death is more powerful than love”.

 

“Interminable Life”

1. Describe how Roberto and Ana had the perfect loving relationship.

2. What role does Roberto feel doctors should play when their patients are terminally ill?

3. How do Ana and Roberto live their lives according to their values?

 

 

 

Discussion 4

The Stories of Eva Luna
Stories 7 & 8

“The Road North”

1. How does Jesús Dionisio Picero make a living?

2. How does Jesús’ carvings change throughout his life?

3. Is Claveles a good mother to Juan? Why was she tempted by the offer to send him to the U.S.?

4. Note the contrasts in this story between:
Death & Life
City & Country
Rich & Poor
Modern & Traditional
Rejection & Acceptance
Lies & Truth

“The Proper Respect”

1. Why is Domingo Toro, “an unscrupulous rogue”, the perfect companion for Abigail McGovern?

2. Even though Abigail is very wealthy, what is missing from her life?

3. How do we know the kidnapping was staged?

4. What was the effect of the kidnapping on the Toros?

 

Discussion 5

The Stories of Eva Luna
Stories 9 & 10

“Tosca”

1. From an early age Maurizia has a problem making realistic choices. How does this effect her in her life?

2. Why does Maurizia choose Leonardo over her son Ezio?

3. At the end of the story, Maurizia has the choice to step out from the shadows and speak to her son and husband, but she does not do so. Why?

 

“The Schoolteacher’s Guest”

1. How does Inés lose her son?

2. What role does Inés have in the town of Agua Santa?

3. Why did the town conspire to cover up Inés’ crime?

4. Did Inés do the right thing?

 

 

 

 

 

Discussion 6

The Stories of Eva Luna
Stories 11 & 12

“Clarisa”

1. Describe the changes Clarisa sees in her lifetime.

2. Why is she not recognized as a saint?

3. How does she deal with the thief who breaks into her house?

4. Why doesn’t Clarisa consider her unfaithfulness to her husband to be her greatest sin?

 

“Letters of Betrayed Love”

1. Why is it obvious that Analía Torres’ uncle wants her inheritance?

2. How is Analía fooled by her uncle’s scheme?

3. Who does Analía fall in love with?

4. What is the message regarding love from this story?

 

 

 

 

Discussion 7

The Stories of Eva Luna
Stories 13 & 14

“Gift for a Sweetheart”

1. What is Horacio’s reaction to Patricia the first time he sees her?

2. Do you think love at first sight is possible?

3. What is Patricia’s reaction to Horacio’s advances?

4. What finally convinces Patricia to meet Horacio?

 

“And of Clay We Are Created”

1. What happens to Azucena when the volcano erupts?

2. How is her predicament similar to Jesus on the cross?

3. What happens to the reporter, Rolf Carlé, during the time he spends with Azucena?

 

 

 

11/12 English
Seán's Class


Own Topic Journals

Length = 45 lines, full sentence and paragraph format, proofread.

You can write about any topic you want, but you must stay on that topic. That is, don’t wander from one topic to another. Instead, pick an issue and discuss it in two paragraphs.

Some students decide to write a poem or a short story and this is fine.

Other students have a hard time coming up with ideas. If you can’t think of a topic, you can choose from the list below:

1. Educational goals (3 paragraphs): What are your educational goals for this year? What might be some obstacles that may get in your way? What strategies can you use to overcome these obstacles?

2. The Best (3 paragraphs): The best movie you’ve seen. The best book you’ve read. The best music you’ve heard.

3. Controversial Issue (3 paragraphs): Pick an issue from the list below and present one side of the issue, the opposite view, and where you stand and why.
• Drugs
• War
• Abortion
• Capital Punishment
• Current issues: violence in schools, tasers, etc.
• Relationship Abuse
• “isms”: racism, sexism, classism, homophobia, etc.
• Native Rights


What I saw (or thought) on my way here today
The most important thing for me right now is ...
A dream (real or imaginary)
What would I do today with a) one hundred dollars b) one million dollars c) ten dollars
A most enjoyable day
A memorable person or an interesting character
What is the good life?
I don’t like ...
A favourite activity
I’m proud of myself because...
A wonderful day
My freedom is important to me
I worry about
A dream
What it is like to be old
A good friend
A false friend
A beautiful place
Money is a drug
My favourite part of Toronto
Doing the right thing
A very difficult person
Someone I admire
How children should be raised
How children should not be raised
What I want is ...
A season I like is ...
I (or we) shall overcome
One thing that makes me angry is ...
One thing that makes me happy is ...
Pets

The journal can describe your own life, dreams, or experiences. but does not have to. You can “make up “ responses to these ideas as if you were another person.

Quad 3 11/12English Seán’s Class

Literature Response Topics

Pick 5 of the following topics for your Literature Responses.
Length = 45 lines.

“THE GOLD OF TOMÁS VARGAS”
1. Who is Tomás Vargas? Did the women do the right thing? What is the moral of the story?

“TWO WORDS”
2. Describe how Belisa Crepusculario uses words. Explain the power and magic that she has. Take a guess as to what the “Two Words” were and why they worked on the Colonel.

“WALIMAI” & “INTERMINABLE LIFE”
3. Compare and contrast “Walimai” and “Interminable Life”. How does each deal with the subject of death and love?

4. Tell me about the life and decisions of Roberto (from “Interminable Life”). Do you agree with the choices he made?

“THE SCHOOLTEACHER’S GUEST”
5. Does Inés do the right thing (from “The Schoolteacher’s Guest”)? Is it justice?

6. Describe the town of Santa Agua. Would you like to grow up there?

7. What is Allende’s message about love from the story “Letters of Betrayed Love”? Do you agree?

Daphne’s Additional Literature Response Topics

These topics were written by Daphne, a former Contact student and student-teacher.
You can use them in place of my topics if you wish.

1. “Gift for a Sweetheart”
What do you think about the concept “Love at first sight”? How would you respond to Horacio’s courting attempts? Is laughter important to you in a relationship?

2. “Letters of Betrayed Love”
Reflect on the roles of women in Allende’s storytelling, focusing on Analia’s particular character. Is there a common theme or a lot of diversity?

3. “Clarisa”
What do you think about Clarisa and the life she lived? What would you have done differently (or the same)?

4. “And of Clay Are We Created”
Reflecting on the effect of Azucena’s situation on Rolf Carle, have you ever had an experience like that where another person’s experience has made you re-evaluate or re-examine your life and what you do? Write about it.

5. Paying close attention to the role of the camera and the television in Eva and Rolf’s relationship in this story, write about your observations and perception of it.

 
 
11 English
Seán's Class

Gr. 11 Own Book Report


Please write 2.5 pages (75 lines) in complete sentences and paragraphs.
Each question should be answered in one paragraph.

1. Compare and contrast the two main characters in the book.

2. Briefly, describe the plot of the story, especially the key events (write one paragraph only).

3. What is the moral of the story? In short, what message does the author want to give to you, the reader?

4. Give three reasons why you liked or disliked the book.

5. Make up your own question about the book and answer it. (The question and answer are both important.)


Quad 3 11/12 English Seán’s Class
Film Report
“Missing”

1. How and Why does the relationship between Ed and Beth change throughout the film?

2. Explain how the death of Charles affects the relationship between him and his father Ed. Why is this ironic?

3. Why is Charles murdered?

4. What is the motivation for the U.S. military involvement in the coup?

5. What is the relationship between death and love in the film?

Length = 1.5 pages

Persuasive Essay Topics

Answer ONE of the following questions in an organized essay of 1000 words (Gr. 11) or 1,200 words (Gr. 12).

1. Examine the women in Allende’s stories. How are they presented? (As victims? oppressed? liberated? heroes? dependent? independent? role models? wise? ignorant? leaders? followers? etc., etc.)

2. Compare and contrast the way Allende presents rich and poor characters. Is she being fair and honest in her presentations?

3. The cycles of life and death are central themes in Allende’s stories. How does she deal with these subjects in her stories?

Allende has been criticized for writing simplistic and overly romantic stories. Comment on this criticism using examples from the book to back up your opinion.

Compare how Allende presents female and male characters.

How does karma effect the characters in Allende’s stories.

7. Examine the moral choices characters make and the consequences that result.

8. Come up with your own question and get it approved by Seán before you start writing.

 

NOTES:
Refer to the checklist before handing in your essay.
Always use specific details from the stories to back up your views.
2. Put story titles in quotes and underline book title. Example: “The Road North” in The Stories of Eva Luna.
3. When you quote from the text, it is sufficient for this essay to put the page number in brackets at the end of your sentence. Example: (p. 214).

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Gr. 12 English Independent Study Unit Seán’s Class

Gr. 12 English Independent Study Unit Seán’s Class

Exploratory Reading:
1.Primary Sources:
* A minimum of two full length books or the equivalent should be read.
*At least one should be a novel. You may also read plays, poetry collections, articles, non-fiction books, biography/autobiography, etc.
* While reading, you should be considering an idea to shape into a thesis
for your essay.

2. Secondary Sources:
* These are readings about your books. A minimum of three items must be consulted.
*An important guideline: your own ideas before the critics.

3. Notes on your books:
Submit brief notes about the following topics for each of your books:
a) Main characters
b) Plot
c) Themes/Issues

Time Management
* Come prepared for conferences with work in progress and with specific proposals and questions for the teacher.
* Use class time productively.

Paper
* All steps of the writing process will be followed and submitted with the paper to be evaluated.
* See “ISU Checklist” sheet for those details.
* Length: College Level = 1200 words
University Level = 1500-2000 words.

Evaluation

Exploratory Reading, Log, Notes = 5 marks

Thesis, Plan, Draft = 5 marks

Essay = 20 marks

Total = 30 marks

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Contact School

COURSE  ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION  OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE:

Grade 11 College English

   COURSE CODE:

ENG3C

COURSE TYPE/GRADE:

College/11

 CREDIT VALUE:

1

PREREQUISITE:

Gr. 10 Applied English

DATE:

2017-2018

TEACHER NAME:

Seán Adams

PERIOD:

D

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and

creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will

analyse challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well

as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts

in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and

clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course

is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college

preparation course.

 

OVERALL CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS:

Oral Communication

1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety

of situations for a variety of purposes;

2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate

with different audiences for a variety of purposes;

3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers,

areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.

Reading and Literature Studies

1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of informational, literary,

and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;

2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements

and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;

3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.

Writing

1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write

for an intended purpose and audience;

2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational,

literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;

3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies,

and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work

effectively;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.

                                                                                                                                                                                               

Media Studies

1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;

2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and

explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning;

3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences,

using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters

and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding

and creating media texts.

 

ASSESSMENT:

Throughout the course, a range of instructional strategies will be used to address students’ needs.  Assessment is the onoing proces of gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources. Diagnostic assessments are used to identify students’ strengths and learning needs to assist with planning, modifying and adjusting instruction.  Formative assessments, which occur throughout the learning process, give students multiple opportunities to practice and receive feedback in an effort to improve their learning and achievement of the curriculum expectations.

EVALUATION:

Evaluation measures achievement of the overall curriculum expectations.  They are summative and usually take place at the end of important segments of learning (end of a unit, strand, term, semester), following student practice and constructive feedback.  Evaluations give students an opportunity to apply and demonstrate their learning based on established achievement criteria. 

Seventy per cent (70%) of the final grade will be based on the evaluations conducted during the course. There will be numerous and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four achievement categories according to the weighting described below.  Missed and/or incomplete assignments will have an impact on the final grade where there are a number of curriculum expectations that have not been evaluated because of missed assignments.

Thirty per cent (30%) of the final grade will be based on summative evaluation(s) administered towards the end of the course and following the same weighting of the achievement chart categories as the term evaluation.  All students must take part in the course-culminating activities that make up the 30% final evaluation mark. 

                                                                                                                       

WEIGHTING ACCORDING TO ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES:

Knowledge/Understanding

25

%

 Thinking

25

%

Communication

25

%

Application

25

%

LEARNING SKILLS:

There are six clusters of learning skills required for effective learning, achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success in and out of school: Responsibility, Independent Work, Organization, Initiative, Collaboration and Self-Regulation. 

LATE & MISSED ASSIGNMENTS:

Submitting course work on time is an important aspect of student learning and time management.  Students will be informed of due dates and ultimate deadlines, which is the last opportunity for students to submit an assignment for evaluation.  Late submissions will be reported as part of the learning skills on the report card and a variety of strategies will be used to encourage on-time submission of assignments including parent, student-teacher conferences, counselling, contracts, alternative assignments and extra help.  A mark deduction for late assignments up to and including the full value of the assignment may be used as a last resort.   

ACADEMIC HONESTY:  

Students are expected to be academically honest by submitting their own original work, and the marks they receive are intended to reflect their own academic achievement.  When evidence of dishonesty is confirmed, the incident and the consequences will be communicated to the principal/vice-principal, the student and parent(s)/guardian.

A mark of zero may be awarded for the assignment in question and a repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences.

COMMUNICATION:

Extra help will be available, including before classes, at lunch, and after school.                                                                

Phone calls home will be made regularly to discuss academics, attendance, punctuality or behaviour.

The teacher can be contacted at 416-393-1455.

Formal Parent/Teacher Meetings/Conferences will be twice a year. Upon request, meetings can be arranged at any time during the school year.

COURSE EVALUATION PLAN

30% Final Evaluations

EVALUATION TASKS

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

WEIGHTING (%)

Exams

K/U,  T, C, A

30

70% Course Work

UNIT SEQUENCE

TIMING

(Hrs or Dates)

EVALUATION TASK(S)

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

DUE DATE

Oral Communication

Each Quad

30 Hours

Literature and Media Oral Questions

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Reading and Literature Studies

Each Quad

30 Hours

Oral and Written Responses to Literature and Media

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Writing

Each Quad

30 Hours

Journals, Literature Responses, Reports, Essays, Media Responses, and Tests.

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly & End of Quad

Media Studies

Each Quad

20 Hours

Article and Film Analyses

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Contact School

COURSE  ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION  OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE:

Grade 12 College English

   COURSE CODE:

ENG4C

COURSE TYPE/GRADE:

College/12

 CREDIT VALUE:

1

PREREQUISITE:

Gr. 11 College English

DATE:

2017-2018

TEACHER NAME:

Seán Adams

PERIOD:

D

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OVERALL CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS:

Oral Communication

1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety

of situations for a variety of purposes;

2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate

with different audiences for a variety of purposes;

3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers,

areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.

Reading and Literature Studies

1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of informational, literary,

and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;

2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements

and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;

3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.

Writing

1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write

for an intended purpose and audience;

2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational,

literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;

3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies,

and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work

effectively;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.

 

Media Studies

1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;

2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning;

3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding and creating media texts.


ASSESSMENT:

Throughout the course, a range of instructional strategies will be used to address students’ needs.  Assessment is the onoing proces of gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources. Diagnostic assessments are used to identify students’ strengths and learning needs to assist with planning, modifying and adjusting instruction.  Formative assessments, which occur throughout the learning process, give students multiple opportunities to practice and receive feedback in an effort to improve their learning and achievement of the curriculum expectations.

EVALUATION:

Evaluation measures achievement of the overall curriculum expectations.  They are summative and usually take place at the end of important segments of learning (end of a unit, strand, term, semester), following student practice and constructive feedback.  Evaluations give students an opportunity to apply and demonstrate their learning based on established achievement criteria. 

Seventy per cent (70%) of the final grade will be based on the evaluations conducted during the course. There will be numerous and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four achievement categories according to the weighting described below.  Missed and/or incomplete assignments will have an impact on the final grade where there are a number of curriculum expectations that have not been evaluated because of missed assignments.

Thirty per cent (30%) of the final grade will be based on summative evaluation(s) administered towards the end of the course and following the same weighting of the achievement chart categories as the term evaluation.  All students must take part in the course-culminating activities that make up the 30% final evaluation mark. 

                                                                                                                       

WEIGHTING ACCORDING TO ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES:

Knowledge/Understanding

25

%

 Thinking

25

%

Communication

25

%

Application

25

%


LEARNING SKILLS:

There are six clusters of learning skills required for effective learning, achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success in and out of school: Responsibility, Independent Work, Organization, Initiative, Collaboration and Self-Regulation. 

LATE & MISSED ASSIGNMENTS:

Submitting course work on time is an important aspect of student learning and time management.  Students will be informed of due dates and ultimate deadlines, which is the last opportunity for students to submit an assignment for evaluation.  Late submissions will be reported as part of the learning skills on the report card and a variety of strategies will be used to encourage on-time submission of assignments including parent, student-teacher conferences, counselling, contracts, alternative assignments and extra help.  A mark deduction for late assignments up to and including the full value of the assignment may be used as a last resort.   

ACADEMIC HONESTY:  

Students are expected to be academically honest by submitting their own original work, and the marks they receive are intended to reflect their own academic achievement.  When evidence of dishonesty is confirmed, the incident and the consequences will be communicated to the principal/vice-principal, the student and parent(s)/guardian.

A mark of zero may be awarded for the assignment in question and a repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences.

COMMUNICATION:

 

Extra help will be available, including before classes, at lunch, and after school.                                                               

Phone calls home will be made regularly to discuss academics, attendance, punctuality or behaviour.

The teacher can be contacted at 416-393-1455.

Formal Parent/Teacher Meetings/Conferences will be twice a year. Upon request, meetings can be arranged at any time during the school year.

 

COURSE EVALUATION PLAN

30% Final Evaluations

EVALUATION TASKS

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

WEIGHTING (%)

Exams

K/U,  T, C, A

30

70% Course Work

UNIT SEQUENCE

TIMING

(Hrs or Dates)

EVALUATION TASK(S)

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

DUE DATE

Oral Communication

Each Quad

30 Hours

Literature and Media Oral Questions

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Reading and Literature Studies

Each Quad

30 Hours

Oral and Written Responses to Literature and Media

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Writing

Each Quad

30 Hours

Journals, Literature Responses, Reports, Essays, Media Responses, and Tests.

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly & End of Quad

Media Studies

Each Quad

20 Hours

Article and Film Analyses

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly