11/12 College English

Quad 3

 

 

 

 

Malcolm X Speaks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quad 3 Dates

 

Malcolm X

Discussion 1

Story 1

"Black Boy"

1. Where and when does this story take place.

2. On the train, what is Richard curious about?

3. Why does Richard hoard bread in his pockets and around the house?

4. What happens to Uncle Hoskins ? Why?

5. What happens to Richard and his family?

 

Discussion 2

Story 2

"The Long Shadow of Little Rock I"

1. Where and when does this story take place.

2. Describe Daisy's first experience with racism.

3. What happened to Daisy’s real mother?

4. How does the truth about her mother affect Daisy?

 

Discussion 3

Story 3

“Nigger”

1. Where and when does this story take place?

2. What is tragic and ironic about Dick’s mother’s job as a maid?

3. How was Dick mistreated at school?

4. Why did the phone in Dick’s home have to be hidden?

 

Discussion 4

Story 4

“The Long Shadow of Little Rock II”

1. Where and when does this story take place?

2. Why were there soldiers guarding Elizabeth’s high school?

3. How did the white mob react when Elizabeth arrived to school?

4. Who helped Elizabeth get away safely?

 

Discussion 5

Chapters 1-2

 

1. Why was Malcolm X's father targeted by the Ku Klux Klan? (pp. 1-3.)

2. Where was Malcolm X born and in what year? (p. 2.) Where did he grow up? (p. 3.)

3. What happens to the family home in 1929? Why? (p. 3.)

4. What happens to Earl Little when Malcolm was 6 years old? (p. 10.)

5. What happens with Earl's insurance policy after his murder? (p. 11.) How does this affect the family?

6. On page 22, Malcolm says that the state social agency destroyed his family. How did it do this?

7. Who are the Swerlins and how does Malcolm end up there? (pp. 26-27.)

8. Who is Ella and why does she impress Malcolm? (p. 34.)

9. What advice does Malcolm's English teacher give him? (pp. 37-38.)

10. Malcolm: "It was then that I began to change - inside." What does he mean by this and how does he change? (pp. 38-39.)

 

 

Discussion 6

Chapters 3-4

 

1. What are the names of the two areas of Roxbury in Boston and to which is Malcolm attracted? Why? (pp. 42-45.)

2. Who is Shorty and what affect does he have on Malcolm? (pp. 46-48.)

3. Describe a zoot suit and a conk. (pp. 54-56.)

4. Who is Laura? (pp. 62-69.) What was her fate? (p. 72.)

5. Why does Malcolm prefer Sophia? (p. 70-71.)

 

 

Discussion 7

Chapters 5-6

 

1. When Malcolm visits Small's Paradise in Harlem, what attracts him to the club (pp. 75-76) and to Harlem (p. 78)?

2. On page 81 Malcolm says, "I was really a clown, but my ignorance made me think I was 'sharp' ". What does he mean by this?

3. Who is Sammy the Pimp (p. 91) and how does he entrap women (pp. 103-104).

4. What are Malcolm's attitudes regarding women? (pp. 94-96.)

5. What job does Malcolm do after he gets fired from Small's? (pp. 101 and 106.)

6. What are the three things that scared Malcolm? (p. 81.)

 

 

Discussion 8

Chapters 7-8

 

1. What three "hustler" jobs does Malcolm have? (pp. 112, 121, and 127.)

2. Why is this chapter called "Trapped"? (p. 135.)

3. Why were Malcolm and West Indian Archie both unwilling to back down over the gambling dispute? (pp. 130 and 133.)

4. Who comes to Malcolm's rescue and where does he take Malcolm? (p. 135.)

 

 

 

11/12 College English
Seán's Class


Own Topic Journals

Length = 45 lines, full sentence and paragraph format, proofread.

You can write about any topic you want, but you must stay on that topic. That is, don’t wander from one topic to another. Instead, pick an issue and discuss it in two paragraphs.

Some students decide to write a poem or a short story and this is fine.

Other students have a hard time coming up with ideas. If you can’t think of a topic, you can choose from the list below:

1. Educational goals (3 paragraphs): What are your educational goals for this year? What might be some obstacles that may get in your way? What strategies can you use to overcome these obstacles?

2. The Best (3 paragraphs): The best movie you’ve seen. The best book you’ve read. The best music you’ve heard.

3. Controversial Issue (3 paragraphs): Pick an issue from the list below and present one side of the issue, the opposite view, and where you stand and why.
• Drugs
• War
• Abortion
• Capital Punishment
• Current issues: violence in schools, tasers, etc.
• Relationship Abuse
• “isms”: racism, sexism, classism, homophobia, etc.
• Native Rights


What I saw (or thought) on my way here today
The most important thing for me right now is ...
A dream (real or imaginary)
What would I do today with a) one hundred dollars b) one million dollars c) ten dollars
A most enjoyable day
A memorable person or an interesting character
What is the good life?
I don’t like ...
A favourite activity
I’m proud of myself because...
A wonderful day
My freedom is important to me
I worry about
A dream
What it is like to be old
A good friend
A false friend
A beautiful place
Money is a drug
My favourite part of Toronto
Doing the right thing
A very difficult person
Someone I admire
How children should be raised
How children should not be raised
What I want is ...
A season I like is ...
I (or we) shall overcome
One thing that makes me angry is ...
One thing that makes me happy is ...
Pets

The journal can describe your own life, dreams, or experiences. but does not have to. You can “make up “ responses to these ideas as if you were another person.

 

 

Quad 3 Senior English Seán’s Class

 

Literature Response Topics
Please write 45 lines for each in complete sentence and paragraph structure.

Quad 3 Topics

1. Define racism. Outline the key points of the racist ideology.
What is your personal reaction to this ideology.

2. Compare the experiences of Richard Wright from “Black Boy” and Daisy Bates from “The Long Shadow of Little RockI” giving a personal response to what you read.

3.Compare the experiences of Dick Gregory from “Nigger” and Elizabeth Eckford from “The Long Shadow of Little Rock II” giving a personal response to what you read.

Quad 3 Senior English Seán’s Class

Video Questions
“Eyes on the Prize”

Emmett Till
Why do you think the lynching of Emmett Till became a catalyst in the national movement for civil rights?

What did the reactions to the brief interaction between Emmett Till and Carolyn Bryant, the white woman in the store, expose about the social system that supported segregation? Why do you think Till’s actions sparked such violence?

What is the role of intimidation, lynching, and fear in a segregated society?

Why were black Americans afraid to testify against whites in the South? What does their fear reveal about justice in the South at that time?

Rosa Parks
Segregation, a social system based on a long history of prejudices and discrimination, was deeply entrenched in people’s minds as well as in the culture. How did segregation manifest itself in daily life in the South? How did segregation disenfranchise black Americans?

What means were available to disenfranchised blacks in America to fight segregation?

What ideology did the White Supremacists espouse? Who were they?

This series is called “Eyes on the Prize.” What is the prize being sought in this episode?

 

Video Questions
“Eyes on the Prize”

Two Societies
What new challenges did the movement face when it shifted its focus to urban centers in the North? How did the struggle there differ from the struggle in the South? What factors were similar?

What were the characteristics of discrimination in Northern urban slums? How does discrimination differ from segregation? Was the struggle against discrimination harder than the battle against segregation in the South?

In the South, discrimination against blacks was codified in the Jim Crow system and state laws. In the North, racism assumed an economic form; it was encoded in practices and economic policies that primarily benefited whites (although the North had its share of poor whites). In Chicago, to whom did the SCLC appeal in order to break the link between race and poverty? Where did the power lie?

The Commission asserted that “it is time now to turn with all the purpose at our command to the major unfinished business of this nation.” What was America’s “unfinished business”? What actions did the Commission recommend in order for America to finish this “business”?

Fighting Back
Why was school desegregation so explosive?

What did Elizabeth Eckford say was her motivation for attending Little Rock Central?

How do you explain the mob’s reaction to Elizabeth’s arrival at school? What do you think white protestors were trying to accomplish?

Hazel Bryan was the young woman shouting at Elizabeth in the photograph. In 1962, five years later, Bryan apologized to Eckford. Bryan later said:
“I don’t know what triggered it, but one day I just started squalling about how she must have felt. I felt so bad that I had done this that I called her [...] and apologized to her. I told her I was sorry that I had done that, that I was not thinking for myself [...]. I think both of us were crying.”4
What do you think might have prompted Bryan’s apology? How important do you think the apology was to Eckford? To Bryan?

Video Questions
“Eyes on the Prize”

The Time Has Come
What did it mean for the movement when SNCC changed its slogan from “Freedom Now” to “Black Power”?
How did Malcolm X’s vision challenge practitioners of nonviolent direct action? Why do you think his ideas resonated with many SNCC activists?
How did Malcolm X characterize the nonviolent movement? Do you agree with his assessment that the movement was “passive”?
Cone believes that “[t]he most common misunderstanding of Malcolm X is that he advocated violence. Malcolm did not advocate violence but rather self-defense.” Why is this distinction important?

Power
In what ways did Stokes’s election represent a milestone for black power? What do you think his election meant for black citizens?

Newton and Seale called their party the Black Panther Party for Self Defense. What does the full name of the party suggest about its mission? What does it suggest about the members’ attitudes?

Why did the BPP’s approach appeal to many young black men who felt left out of the democratic process?

 
Senior English
Seán's Class

Gr. 11 Own Book Report


Please write 2.5 pages (75 lines) in complete sentences and paragraphs.
Each question should be answered in one paragraph.

1. Compare and contrast the two main characters in the book.

2. Briefly, describe the plot of the story, especially the key events (write one paragraph only).

3. What is the moral of the story? In short, what message does the author want to give to you, the reader?

4. Give three reasons why you liked or disliked the book.

5. Make up your own question about the book and answer it. (The question and answer are both important.)


 
Seán’s Senior English Class
Midterm Test Study Guide
Argument Analysis

Definitions
1. Metaphor: if a statement of comparison is direct, that one thing is another, then the statement is termed a metaphor.

2. Simile: A simile states that one thing is “like” or “as” another.

3. Allusion: a reference to something outside the argument that can increase its significance (eg. biblical allusion).

4. Ethical Appeal: the appeal is based on values or morals generally accepted by the community (eg. human rights or “truth”).

5. Appeal to Religious Values: when the appeal comes directly from teachings of a particular religion (eg. Christianity).

6. Appeal to Authority: the appeal is based on objective evidence from expert sources (eg. research, science, expert, etc.).

7. Repetition: a technique deliberately used for emphasis and rhythm.

8. Analogy: a comparison of two different things to provide insight into the nature of one or both of them.

9. Symbol: an object, person, situation, action, etc. which has a literal meaning in the essay, but suggests or represents other meanings as well.

Sample Questions (“When Silence is Betrayal” by Martin Luther King Jr.)

1. What does King mean by “apathy of conformist thought”? (Paragraph 2, line 5)

2. Explain how King uses the metaphors of darkness and light to strengthen his argument. (First lines of paragraph 3 & 4.)

3. Evaluate the effectiveness of the main metaphor of paragraph 4.

4. To what does the “far deeper malady” refer (Paragraph 5)?

5. According to King, how can the poisoning of America’s soul and the malady of its spirit be avoided?

6. Explain the meaning of the biblical quote. (Paragraph 11, lines 4,5, & 6.)

7. What is the central metaphor of the 12th paragraph?

8. Evaluate the overall strength of King’s arguments in this speech (mention specific techniques used by King).

 
Gr. 12 English Independent Study Unit Seán’s Class

Exploratory Reading:
1.Primary Sources:
* A minimum of two full length books or the equivalent should be read.
*At least one should be a novel. You may also read plays, poetry collections, articles, non-fiction books, biography/autobiography, etc.
* While reading, you should be considering an idea to shape into a thesis
for your essay.

2. Secondary Sources:
* These are readings about your books. A minimum of three items must be consulted.
*An important guideline: your own ideas before the critics.

3. Notes on your books:
Submit brief notes about the following topics for each of your books:
a) Main characters
b) Plot
c) Themes/Issues

Time Management
* Come prepared for conferences with work in progress and with specific proposals and questions for the teacher.
* Use class time productively.

Paper
* All steps of the writing process will be followed and submitted with the paper to be evaluated.
* See “ISU Checklist” sheet for those details.
* Length: College Level = 1200 words
University Level = 1500-2000 words.

Evaluation

Exploratory Reading, Log, Notes = 5 marks

Thesis, Plan, Draft = 5 marks

Essay = 20 marks

Total = 30 marks

 

Contact School

COURSE  ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION  OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE:

Grade 11 College English

   COURSE CODE:

ENG3C

COURSE TYPE/GRADE:

College/11

 CREDIT VALUE:

1

PREREQUISITE:

Gr. 10 Applied English

DATE:

2017-2018

TEACHER NAME:

Seán Adams

PERIOD:

D

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and

creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will

analyse challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well

as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts

in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and

clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course

is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college

preparation course.

 

OVERALL CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS:

Oral Communication

1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety

of situations for a variety of purposes;

2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate

with different audiences for a variety of purposes;

3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers,

areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.

Reading and Literature Studies

1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of informational, literary,

and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;

2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements

and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;

3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.

Writing

1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write

for an intended purpose and audience;

2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational,

literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;

3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies,

and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work

effectively;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.

                                                                                                                                                                                               

Media Studies

1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;

2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and

explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning;

3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences,

using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters

and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding

and creating media texts.

 

ASSESSMENT:

Throughout the course, a range of instructional strategies will be used to address students’ needs.  Assessment is the onoing proces of gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources. Diagnostic assessments are used to identify students’ strengths and learning needs to assist with planning, modifying and adjusting instruction.  Formative assessments, which occur throughout the learning process, give students multiple opportunities to practice and receive feedback in an effort to improve their learning and achievement of the curriculum expectations.

EVALUATION:

Evaluation measures achievement of the overall curriculum expectations.  They are summative and usually take place at the end of important segments of learning (end of a unit, strand, term, semester), following student practice and constructive feedback.  Evaluations give students an opportunity to apply and demonstrate their learning based on established achievement criteria. 

Seventy per cent (70%) of the final grade will be based on the evaluations conducted during the course. There will be numerous and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four achievement categories according to the weighting described below.  Missed and/or incomplete assignments will have an impact on the final grade where there are a number of curriculum expectations that have not been evaluated because of missed assignments.

Thirty per cent (30%) of the final grade will be based on summative evaluation(s) administered towards the end of the course and following the same weighting of the achievement chart categories as the term evaluation.  All students must take part in the course-culminating activities that make up the 30% final evaluation mark. 

                                                                                                                       

WEIGHTING ACCORDING TO ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES:

Knowledge/Understanding

25

%

 Thinking

25

%

Communication

25

%

Application

25

%

LEARNING SKILLS:

There are six clusters of learning skills required for effective learning, achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success in and out of school: Responsibility, Independent Work, Organization, Initiative, Collaboration and Self-Regulation. 

LATE & MISSED ASSIGNMENTS:

Submitting course work on time is an important aspect of student learning and time management.  Students will be informed of due dates and ultimate deadlines, which is the last opportunity for students to submit an assignment for evaluation.  Late submissions will be reported as part of the learning skills on the report card and a variety of strategies will be used to encourage on-time submission of assignments including parent, student-teacher conferences, counselling, contracts, alternative assignments and extra help.  A mark deduction for late assignments up to and including the full value of the assignment may be used as a last resort.   

ACADEMIC HONESTY:  

Students are expected to be academically honest by submitting their own original work, and the marks they receive are intended to reflect their own academic achievement.  When evidence of dishonesty is confirmed, the incident and the consequences will be communicated to the principal/vice-principal, the student and parent(s)/guardian.

A mark of zero may be awarded for the assignment in question and a repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences.

COMMUNICATION:

Extra help will be available, including before classes, at lunch, and after school.                                                                

Phone calls home will be made regularly to discuss academics, attendance, punctuality or behaviour.

The teacher can be contacted at 416-393-1455.

Formal Parent/Teacher Meetings/Conferences will be twice a year. Upon request, meetings can be arranged at any time during the school year.

COURSE EVALUATION PLAN

30% Final Evaluations

EVALUATION TASKS

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

WEIGHTING (%)

Exams

K/U,  T, C, A

30

70% Course Work

UNIT SEQUENCE

TIMING

(Hrs or Dates)

EVALUATION TASK(S)

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

DUE DATE

Oral Communication

Each Quad

30 Hours

Literature and Media Oral Questions

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Reading and Literature Studies

Each Quad

30 Hours

Oral and Written Responses to Literature and Media

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Writing

Each Quad

30 Hours

Journals, Literature Responses, Reports, Essays, Media Responses, and Tests.

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly & End of Quad

Media Studies

Each Quad

20 Hours

Article and Film Analyses

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

 

Contact School

COURSE  ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION  OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE:

Grade 12 College English

   COURSE CODE:

ENG4C

COURSE TYPE/GRADE:

College/12

 CREDIT VALUE:

1

PREREQUISITE:

Gr. 11 College English

DATE:

2017-2018

TEACHER NAME:

Seán Adams

PERIOD:

D

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OVERALL CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS:

Oral Communication

1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety

of situations for a variety of purposes;

2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate

with different audiences for a variety of purposes;

3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers,

areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.

Reading and Literature Studies

1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of informational, literary,

and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;

2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements

and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;

3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.

Writing

1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write

for an intended purpose and audience;

2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational,

literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;

3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies,

and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work

effectively;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.

 

Media Studies

1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;

2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning;

3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding and creating media texts.


ASSESSMENT:

Throughout the course, a range of instructional strategies will be used to address students’ needs.  Assessment is the onoing proces of gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources. Diagnostic assessments are used to identify students’ strengths and learning needs to assist with planning, modifying and adjusting instruction.  Formative assessments, which occur throughout the learning process, give students multiple opportunities to practice and receive feedback in an effort to improve their learning and achievement of the curriculum expectations.

EVALUATION:

Evaluation measures achievement of the overall curriculum expectations.  They are summative and usually take place at the end of important segments of learning (end of a unit, strand, term, semester), following student practice and constructive feedback.  Evaluations give students an opportunity to apply and demonstrate their learning based on established achievement criteria. 

Seventy per cent (70%) of the final grade will be based on the evaluations conducted during the course. There will be numerous and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four achievement categories according to the weighting described below.  Missed and/or incomplete assignments will have an impact on the final grade where there are a number of curriculum expectations that have not been evaluated because of missed assignments.

Thirty per cent (30%) of the final grade will be based on summative evaluation(s) administered towards the end of the course and following the same weighting of the achievement chart categories as the term evaluation.  All students must take part in the course-culminating activities that make up the 30% final evaluation mark. 

                                                                                                                       

WEIGHTING ACCORDING TO ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES:

Knowledge/Understanding

25

%

 Thinking

25

%

Communication

25

%

Application

25

%


LEARNING SKILLS:

There are six clusters of learning skills required for effective learning, achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success in and out of school: Responsibility, Independent Work, Organization, Initiative, Collaboration and Self-Regulation. 

LATE & MISSED ASSIGNMENTS:

Submitting course work on time is an important aspect of student learning and time management.  Students will be informed of due dates and ultimate deadlines, which is the last opportunity for students to submit an assignment for evaluation.  Late submissions will be reported as part of the learning skills on the report card and a variety of strategies will be used to encourage on-time submission of assignments including parent, student-teacher conferences, counselling, contracts, alternative assignments and extra help.  A mark deduction for late assignments up to and including the full value of the assignment may be used as a last resort.   

ACADEMIC HONESTY:  

Students are expected to be academically honest by submitting their own original work, and the marks they receive are intended to reflect their own academic achievement.  When evidence of dishonesty is confirmed, the incident and the consequences will be communicated to the principal/vice-principal, the student and parent(s)/guardian.

A mark of zero may be awarded for the assignment in question and a repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences.

COMMUNICATION:

 

Extra help will be available, including before classes, at lunch, and after school.                                                               

Phone calls home will be made regularly to discuss academics, attendance, punctuality or behaviour.

The teacher can be contacted at 416-393-1455.

Formal Parent/Teacher Meetings/Conferences will be twice a year. Upon request, meetings can be arranged at any time during the school year.

 

COURSE EVALUATION PLAN

30% Final Evaluations

EVALUATION TASKS

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

WEIGHTING (%)

Exams

K/U,  T, C, A

30

70% Course Work

UNIT SEQUENCE

TIMING

(Hrs or Dates)

EVALUATION TASK(S)

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

DUE DATE

Oral Communication

Each Quad

30 Hours

Literature and Media Oral Questions

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Reading and Literature Studies

Each Quad

30 Hours

Oral and Written Responses to Literature and Media

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Writing

Each Quad

30 Hours

Journals, Literature Responses, Reports, Essays, Media Responses, and Tests.

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly & End of Quad

Media Studies

Each Quad

20 Hours

Article and Film Analyses

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly