11/12 CollegeEnglish

Quad 4

 

 

Malcolm X Speaks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quad 4 Calendar

 

Malcolm X

Discussion 1

Chapters 9 and 10

 

1. Why was Ella shocked by Malcolm's attitude when he returns to Boston? (p. 137.)

2. How does Malcolm treat Sophia when he returns to Boston? (p. 138.)

3. What is Malcolm's new " hustle" in Boston? (pp. 143-145.)

4. How does Malcolm establish who's the boss in his gang? (p. 146.)

5. If Malcolm knew that he was going to get caught, why didn't he do something else? (pp. 149-150.)

6. How was the gang caught? (pp. 151-152.)

7. What was the length of Malcolm's and Shorty's prison sentence? How old was Malcolm? (pp. 154-155.)

8. Why was Malcolm called "Satan" in his cell block? (p. 156.)

9. How was Reginald able to get Malcolm to listen to the teachings of the Nation of Islam? (pp. 161-164.)

 

 

Malcolm X

Discussion 2

Chapters 11 and 12

1. How does Malcolm use the dictionary to educate himself? (pp. 175-176.)

2. What is the difference between "the white man is the devil" and "the collective white man had acted like a devil"? (pp. 179-181.)

3. What was Reginald's fate? (pp. 189-192.)

4. Why does Malcolm change his last name to "X"? (p. 203.)

5. Who are W.D. Fard and Elijah Muhammad? (pp. 211-214.)

 

 

Malcolm X

Discussion 3

Chapter 13-14

1. What was the fate of Sammy the Pimp and West Indian Archie. (pp. 220-221.)

2. What does this tell you about the gangster lifestyle?

3. What is the Fruit of Islam? (p. 226.)

4. How does Minister Malcolm's attitude to money different than when he was Detroit Red? (p. 229.)

5. What is Malcolm's attitude toward women (pp. 230 & 236).

6. Outline the rules for heterosexual couples according to the Nation of Islam and how Malcolm meets Betty. (p. 233-235.)

7. Considering the viewpoint of the TV documentary, does the Nation of Islam preach hate? (pp. 242-243.)

8. According to the Nation of Islam, what is the difference between separation and segregation? (p. 251.)

9. Explain how the Nation of Islam helps treat drug addiction. (p. 264.)

 

 

Malcolm X

Discussion 4

Chapter 15

1. Why is this chapter called Icarus? p. 293

2. What is the distinction between the "individual white man" and the "historical record of the collective white man"? P. 271

3. Why is Malcolm X against northern whites going south as part of the Freedom Riders? P. 276

4. Outline Malcolm's views of mixed race marriages and your own views as well. p. 282

5. Why does Malcolm call the March on Washington the "Farce on Washington"? What is your view? p. 284

6. What does Malcolm tell the young white woman who asks what she can do to help fight racism? p. 292

 

Malcolm X

Discussion 5

Chapter 16

1. Why is this chapter called “Out”? p. 294

2. Malcolm X said to his wife Betty that if anything ever happened to him, that “the Nation of Islam would take care of her for the rest of her life, and of our children until they were grown. I could never have been a bigger fool” (P. 297). Why is this a foolish thing to think?

3. What does Malcolm X discover about how Elijah Muhammad betrayed the Nation of Islam? pp. 301-305.

4. After Malcolm is expelled from the Nation of Islam, there is an actual benefit to him. What is this benefit?. p. 322-323

5. Why did the Nation of Islam expel Malcolm X and issue orders for him to be killed?

 

 

Malcolm X

Discussion 6

Chapter 17

1. What is Hajj? (p. 325.)

2. What is the difference between the Nation of Islam and what Malcolm X calls "true Islam"? (pp. 325 & 345.)

3. How has Ella helped Malcolm throughout his life? (p. 326.)

4. Explain what Malcolm means when he says "That morning was when I first began to reappraise the 'white man'". (p. 340.)

5. What is the key message from Malcolm X's letter from Mecca? (pp. 346-348.)

 

Malcolm X

Discussion 7

Chapter 18

1. Why is the chapter called "El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz"?

2. Who is John Howard Griffin? (p. 353.)

3. Explain the importance of the international dimension in fighting racism in America. (pp. 352-353 & 357.)

4. "In two weeks in the Holy Land, I saw what I never had seen in thirthy-nine years here in America". What does Malcolm X mean? (p. 369.)

5. What reaction does Malcolm get after he speaks to the press about his new ideas? (p. 370.)

 

Malcolm X

Discussion 8

Chapter 19

1. Malcolm: "I believed in him [Elijah Muhammad] not only as a leader in the ordinary human sense, but I also believed in him as a devine leader" (p. 372). What does this mean and why does Malcolm consider it dangerous?

2. What does Malcolm mean by "criminal philosophies" and why does he regard them as such? (pp. 373-374.)

3, Malcolm: "... the white man is not inherently evil, but America's racist society influences him to act evilly" (p. 378). Explain what Malcolm means and why this is ultimately a positive statement.

4. Refer to pages 292 and 383 and outline how Malcolm X changed his approach to whites. What advice does he offer to whites who want to fight racism?

5. Why does Malcolm believe he will never die of old age? (pp. 385-386.)

6. What value does Malcolm feel his book may have? (p. 386.)

 

 

 

11/12 College English
Seán's Class


Own Topic Journals

Length = 45 lines, full sentence and paragraph format, proofread.

You can write about any topic you want, but you must stay on that topic. That is, don’t wander from one topic to another. Instead, pick an issue and discuss it in two paragraphs.

Some students decide to write a poem or a short story and this is fine.

Other students have a hard time coming up with ideas. If you can’t think of a topic, you can choose from the list below:

1. Educational goals (3 paragraphs): What are your educational goals for this year? What might be some obstacles that may get in your way? What strategies can you use to overcome these obstacles?

2. The Best (3 paragraphs): The best movie you’ve seen. The best book you’ve read. The best music you’ve heard.

3. Controversial Issue (3 paragraphs): Pick an issue from the list below and present one side of the issue, the opposite view, and where you stand and why.
• Drugs
• War
• Abortion
• Capital Punishment
• Current issues: violence in schools, tasers, etc.
• Relationship Abuse
• “isms”: racism, sexism, classism, homophobia, etc.
• Native Rights


What I saw (or thought) on my way here today
The most important thing for me right now is ...
A dream (real or imaginary)
What would I do today with a) one hundred dollars b) one million dollars c) ten dollars
A most enjoyable day
A memorable person or an interesting character
What is the good life?
I don’t like ...
A favourite activity
I’m proud of myself because...
A wonderful day
My freedom is important to me
I worry about
A dream
What it is like to be old
A good friend
A false friend
A beautiful place
Money is a drug
My favourite part of Toronto
Doing the right thing
A very difficult person
Someone I admire
How children should be raised
How children should not be raised
What I want is ...
A season I like is ...
I (or we) shall overcome
One thing that makes me angry is ...
One thing that makes me happy is ...
Pets

The journal can describe your own life, dreams, or experiences. but does not have to. You can “make up “ responses to these ideas as if you were another person.

 

 

Quad 4 Senior English Seán’s Class

 

Literature Response Topics
Please write 45 lines for each in complete sentence and paragraph structure.

Quad 4 Topics

1. Considering what you know from the short stories, the novel, and the "Eyes on the Prize" video, describe what life was like for Black Americans living in a racist society.
Some possible topics that you may wish to cover:
- segregation in schools, buses, restaurants, waiting rooms, jobs, etc.
- violence and terrorism by police and white racists.
- second class status of Blacks in employment , housing, schooling, voting.
- self-esteem, self-respect, low expectations.
- poverty.

2. Why was Malcolm X, an anti-religious street-hustler, attracted to the Nation of Islam?
What did the Nation of Islam offer to Black Americans?

3. What is the most important lesson that Malcolm X learned in Mecca? Why did it take him 39 years to learn this?

Senior English
Seán’s Class

Selma Film Questions

1. a) What was President Johnson's initial position on creating a Voting Rights Bill and and his rationale for opposing it?

b) Why did he change his position and ultimately introduce the Voting Rights Act of 1965?

2. Why did King regard Selma as an ideal staging ground for the battle to win voting rights? How did Sheriff Jim Clark's reputation influence King's decision to fight the battle in Selma?

3. What was Malcolm X's goal in going to Selma?

4. Some have criticized King for the violence perpetrated against African-Americans because his deliberately provocative campaigns inevitably led to a violent response by white racists. Do you agree?

5. What were the reasons for the victory of the Civil Rights protesters in securing a Voting Rights Act in 1965?

Film Review
“Malcolm X”

Please answer the following questions in complete sentences. Length = 2 pages minimum, 3 pages maximum.

Give examples to back up your opinions.

1. Overall, what did you think of Spike Lee’s film “Malcolm X”? Why?

2. Examine the character of Malcolm X. Considering Spike Lee’s direction and Denzel Washington’s acting, how well was the character developed? (Did you really get to know him?)

3. Spike Lee was criticized for leaving out Ella from the film. Do you agree and generally how did he handle the portrayal of women?

4. Write about 2 or 3 things that were done differently in the film compared to the book. What effect do these differences have?

 

 
 

Senior English
Seán’s Class

Gr. 11 Only

Persuasive Essay Topics

Answer ONE of the following questions in an organized essay.

Length = 1,000-1,200 words.

1. Why was Malcolm X popular among his people? What did he have to offer that was unique?

2. How did Malcolm X's past life influence his decision to work for Black liberation?

3. Outline the three major changes in Malcolm X's life and comment on each phase. You may wish to emphasize growth, change, contrast, etc. in your commentary.

4. Make up your own topic and get it approved before you start writing.

NOTES:
1. Always use specific details from the novel to back up your views.
2. Underline or italicize the book title. Example: The Autobiography of Malcolm X or The Autobiography of Malcolm X.
3. When you quote from the text, it is sufficient for this term paper to put the page number in brackets at the end of your sentence. Example: (p. 214).

e
 
Gr. 12 English Independent Study Unit Seán’s Class

Exploratory Reading:
1.Primary Sources:
* A minimum of two full length books or the equivalent should be read.
*At least one should be a novel. You may also read plays, poetry collections, articles, non-fiction books, biography/autobiography, etc.
* While reading, you should be considering an idea to shape into a thesis
for your essay.

2. Secondary Sources:
* These are readings about your books. A minimum of three items must be consulted.
*An important guideline: your own ideas before the critics.

3. Notes on your books:
Submit brief notes about the following topics for each of your books:
a) Main characters
b) Plot
c) Themes/Issues

Time Management
* Come prepared for conferences with work in progress and with specific proposals and questions for the teacher.
* Use class time productively.

Paper
* All steps of the writing process will be followed and submitted with the paper to be evaluated.
* See “ISU Checklist” sheet for those details.
* Length: College Level = 1200 words
University Level = 1500-2000 words.

Evaluation

Exploratory Reading, Log, Notes = 5 marks

Thesis, Plan, Draft = 5 marks

Essay = 20 marks

Total = 30 marks

 

Contact School

COURSE  ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION  OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE:

Grade 11 College English

   COURSE CODE:

ENG3C

COURSE TYPE/GRADE:

College/11

 CREDIT VALUE:

1

PREREQUISITE:

Gr. 10 Applied English

DATE:

2017-2018

TEACHER NAME:

Seán Adams

PERIOD:

D

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and

creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will

analyse challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well

as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts

in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and

clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course

is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college

preparation course.

 

OVERALL CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS:

Oral Communication

1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety

of situations for a variety of purposes;

2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate

with different audiences for a variety of purposes;

3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers,

areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.

Reading and Literature Studies

1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of informational, literary,

and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;

2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements

and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;

3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.

Writing

1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write

for an intended purpose and audience;

2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational,

literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;

3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies,

and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work

effectively;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.

                                                                                                                                                                                               

Media Studies

1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;

2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and

explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning;

3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences,

using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters

and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding

and creating media texts.

 

ASSESSMENT:

Throughout the course, a range of instructional strategies will be used to address students’ needs.  Assessment is the onoing proces of gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources. Diagnostic assessments are used to identify students’ strengths and learning needs to assist with planning, modifying and adjusting instruction.  Formative assessments, which occur throughout the learning process, give students multiple opportunities to practice and receive feedback in an effort to improve their learning and achievement of the curriculum expectations.

EVALUATION:

Evaluation measures achievement of the overall curriculum expectations.  They are summative and usually take place at the end of important segments of learning (end of a unit, strand, term, semester), following student practice and constructive feedback.  Evaluations give students an opportunity to apply and demonstrate their learning based on established achievement criteria. 

Seventy per cent (70%) of the final grade will be based on the evaluations conducted during the course. There will be numerous and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four achievement categories according to the weighting described below.  Missed and/or incomplete assignments will have an impact on the final grade where there are a number of curriculum expectations that have not been evaluated because of missed assignments.

Thirty per cent (30%) of the final grade will be based on summative evaluation(s) administered towards the end of the course and following the same weighting of the achievement chart categories as the term evaluation.  All students must take part in the course-culminating activities that make up the 30% final evaluation mark. 

                                                                                                                       

WEIGHTING ACCORDING TO ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES:

Knowledge/Understanding

25

%

 Thinking

25

%

Communication

25

%

Application

25

%

LEARNING SKILLS:

There are six clusters of learning skills required for effective learning, achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success in and out of school: Responsibility, Independent Work, Organization, Initiative, Collaboration and Self-Regulation. 

LATE & MISSED ASSIGNMENTS:

Submitting course work on time is an important aspect of student learning and time management.  Students will be informed of due dates and ultimate deadlines, which is the last opportunity for students to submit an assignment for evaluation.  Late submissions will be reported as part of the learning skills on the report card and a variety of strategies will be used to encourage on-time submission of assignments including parent, student-teacher conferences, counselling, contracts, alternative assignments and extra help.  A mark deduction for late assignments up to and including the full value of the assignment may be used as a last resort.   

ACADEMIC HONESTY:  

Students are expected to be academically honest by submitting their own original work, and the marks they receive are intended to reflect their own academic achievement.  When evidence of dishonesty is confirmed, the incident and the consequences will be communicated to the principal/vice-principal, the student and parent(s)/guardian.

A mark of zero may be awarded for the assignment in question and a repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences.

COMMUNICATION:

Extra help will be available, including before classes, at lunch, and after school.                                                                

Phone calls home will be made regularly to discuss academics, attendance, punctuality or behaviour.

The teacher can be contacted at 416-393-1455.

Formal Parent/Teacher Meetings/Conferences will be twice a year. Upon request, meetings can be arranged at any time during the school year.

COURSE EVALUATION PLAN

30% Final Evaluations

EVALUATION TASKS

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

WEIGHTING (%)

Exams

K/U,  T, C, A

30

70% Course Work

UNIT SEQUENCE

TIMING

(Hrs or Dates)

EVALUATION TASK(S)

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

DUE DATE

Oral Communication

Each Quad

30 Hours

Literature and Media Oral Questions

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Reading and Literature Studies

Each Quad

30 Hours

Oral and Written Responses to Literature and Media

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Writing

Each Quad

30 Hours

Journals, Literature Responses, Reports, Essays, Media Responses, and Tests.

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly & End of Quad

Media Studies

Each Quad

20 Hours

Article and Film Analyses

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

 

Contact School

COURSE  ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION  OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE:

Grade 12 College English

   COURSE CODE:

ENG4C

COURSE TYPE/GRADE:

College/12

 CREDIT VALUE:

1

PREREQUISITE:

Gr. 11 College English

DATE:

2017-2018

TEACHER NAME:

Seán Adams

PERIOD:

D

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OVERALL CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS:

Oral Communication

1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety

of situations for a variety of purposes;

2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate

with different audiences for a variety of purposes;

3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers,

areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.

Reading and Literature Studies

1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of informational, literary,

and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;

2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements

and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;

3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.

Writing

1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write

for an intended purpose and audience;

2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational,

literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;

3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies,

and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work

effectively;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.

 

Media Studies

1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;

2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning;

3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding and creating media texts.


ASSESSMENT:

Throughout the course, a range of instructional strategies will be used to address students’ needs.  Assessment is the onoing proces of gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources. Diagnostic assessments are used to identify students’ strengths and learning needs to assist with planning, modifying and adjusting instruction.  Formative assessments, which occur throughout the learning process, give students multiple opportunities to practice and receive feedback in an effort to improve their learning and achievement of the curriculum expectations.

EVALUATION:

Evaluation measures achievement of the overall curriculum expectations.  They are summative and usually take place at the end of important segments of learning (end of a unit, strand, term, semester), following student practice and constructive feedback.  Evaluations give students an opportunity to apply and demonstrate their learning based on established achievement criteria. 

Seventy per cent (70%) of the final grade will be based on the evaluations conducted during the course. There will be numerous and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four achievement categories according to the weighting described below.  Missed and/or incomplete assignments will have an impact on the final grade where there are a number of curriculum expectations that have not been evaluated because of missed assignments.

Thirty per cent (30%) of the final grade will be based on summative evaluation(s) administered towards the end of the course and following the same weighting of the achievement chart categories as the term evaluation.  All students must take part in the course-culminating activities that make up the 30% final evaluation mark. 

                                                                                                                       

WEIGHTING ACCORDING TO ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES:

Knowledge/Understanding

25

%

 Thinking

25

%

Communication

25

%

Application

25

%


LEARNING SKILLS:

There are six clusters of learning skills required for effective learning, achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success in and out of school: Responsibility, Independent Work, Organization, Initiative, Collaboration and Self-Regulation. 

LATE & MISSED ASSIGNMENTS:

Submitting course work on time is an important aspect of student learning and time management.  Students will be informed of due dates and ultimate deadlines, which is the last opportunity for students to submit an assignment for evaluation.  Late submissions will be reported as part of the learning skills on the report card and a variety of strategies will be used to encourage on-time submission of assignments including parent, student-teacher conferences, counselling, contracts, alternative assignments and extra help.  A mark deduction for late assignments up to and including the full value of the assignment may be used as a last resort.   

ACADEMIC HONESTY:  

Students are expected to be academically honest by submitting their own original work, and the marks they receive are intended to reflect their own academic achievement.  When evidence of dishonesty is confirmed, the incident and the consequences will be communicated to the principal/vice-principal, the student and parent(s)/guardian.

A mark of zero may be awarded for the assignment in question and a repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences.

COMMUNICATION:

 

Extra help will be available, including before classes, at lunch, and after school.                                                               

Phone calls home will be made regularly to discuss academics, attendance, punctuality or behaviour.

The teacher can be contacted at 416-393-1455.

Formal Parent/Teacher Meetings/Conferences will be twice a year. Upon request, meetings can be arranged at any time during the school year.

 

COURSE EVALUATION PLAN

30% Final Evaluations

EVALUATION TASKS

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

WEIGHTING (%)

Exams

K/U,  T, C, A

30

70% Course Work

UNIT SEQUENCE

TIMING

(Hrs or Dates)

EVALUATION TASK(S)

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

DUE DATE

Oral Communication

Each Quad

30 Hours

Literature and Media Oral Questions

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Reading and Literature Studies

Each Quad

30 Hours

Oral and Written Responses to Literature and Media

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Writing

Each Quad

30 Hours

Journals, Literature Responses, Reports, Essays, Media Responses, and Tests.

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly & End of Quad

Media Studies

Each Quad

20 Hours

Article and Film Analyses

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly