11/12 University English Quad 1

 

 

1984 Audiobook

 

Part 1

 

Part 2

 

 

Part 3

 

 

Part 4

 

 

Part 5

 

 

Part 6

 

 

Part 7

 

 

Part 8

 

 

Part 9

 

 

Part 10

 

 

Part 11

 

 

 

 

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Quad 1 Dates
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11/12 University English
Nineteen Eighty-Four

Discussion Questions

1984 Study Notes

Characters
Winston Smith
O'Brien
Julia
Mrs. Parsons
Mr. Parsons
Parsons' children
Big Brother
Emmanuel Goldstein

Setting
Time: April, 1984
Place: London, Airstrip One, Oceania
Physical conditions

Society
Inner Party
Outer Party
Proles

Eurasia
Eastasia
Oceania

Ministry of Love
Ministry of Peace
Ministry of Plenty
Ministry of Truth

Terminology
Two Minutes Hate
Thought Police
Thought Crime
Newspeak
Face crime
Junior Anti-Sex League
Tele screen
Spies

War is Peace
Freedom is Slavery
Ignorance is Strength

 

 

11/12 University English

Discussion 4 Questions

Chapter 1

1. Where does Winston live?

2. What is a telescreen?

3. Describe each of the 4 Ministries functions.

4. Why does Winston start writing a diary?

5. Describe the Two Minutes Hate.

6. Why is Winston attracted to O’Brien?

 

11/12 University English

Discussion 5

Chapters 2-4

 

1. Explain the meaning of the 3 party slogans: “War is Peace”, “Freedom is Slavery”, and “Ignorance is Strength”.

2. Describe Tom Parsons’ character.

3. “Nearly all children nowadays were horrible”. Explain why this is the case.

4. “It was not by making yourself heard but by staying sane that you carried on the human heritage”. Relate this thought to Winston beginning a diary.

5. Why is it difficult for Winston to know the history, including the wars, of his homeland when he was a child?

6. With whom is Oceania at war? Has it always been at war with this super power?

7. “Who controls the past, controls the future: who controls the present, controls the past”. Explain this Party slogan.

8. What is “doublethink”?

9. Where does Winston work? Which department? What does he do there?

10. How many boots were produced in Oceania during the last quarter?

11. How does Comrade Ogilvy illustrate the Party slogan from # 7 above?

12. Describe Winston's character.

 

11/12 University English

Discussion 6

Chapters 5-7

1. Is Syme intelligent? Explain.

2. "Orthodoxy is unconsciousness". Explain this quote in the context of Newspeak.

3. Parsons: "The Ministry of Plenty's certainly done a good job this year. By the way, Smith old boy, I suppose you haven't got any razor blades you can let me have?" Explain the irony here.

4. Why is the Party against sex?

5. Why does Winston have sex with the prostitute?

6. Why did Winston not get along with his wife?

7. Winston's diary entry: "If there is hope, it lies in the proles". What does he mean by this? Is it realizable? Why is there no hope in the Outer and Inner Party members?

8. Are the people of Oceania better off in 1984 than they were fifty years before?

9. Winston wonders if he himself is a lunatic? Why does he question his own sanity?

 

11/12 University English

Discussion 7

Chapter 8

1. Describe what the prole areas are like.

2. What does Winston hope to achieve by talking to the old man in the pub?

3. Why can’t Winston get the information he wants from the old man?

4. What does Winston buy from Mr. Charrington’s shop? Why?

5. What attracts Winston about the room for rent over Mr. Charrington’s shop?

6. Who is following Winston and why is she a threat?

 

11/12 University English

Discussion 8

Part 2 Chapters 1-3

1. What does Winston expect when Julia passes him a note?

2. What is his reaction after he reads the note?

3. Why don't Winston and Julia have sex the first time they try?

4. Why does Winston describe sex with Julia as "a political act"?

5. What age is Winston? Julia? Why is their age gap significant?

6. How is Julia's rebellion against the Party different than Winston's?

7. According to Julia, what is the connection between the Party's anti-sex policy and support for war and B.B.?

 

11/12 University English

Discussion 9

Part 2, Chapter 8 & Half of 9

1. At the beginning of chapter four, Winston goes from feeling violently angry to deep tenderness. How are these mood swings related to the Two Minutes Hate?

2. Given the obvious folly, and even lunacy, of renting the room, why do Winston and Julia do it?

3. Why does Winston have a particular terror when he sees a rat in the room?

4. What is the connection between Julia not knowing that Oceania was at war with Eastasia four years ago, and Winston's statement the Julia was a "rebel from the waist down"?

5. Confession vs. Betrayal: "If they could make me stop loving you - that would be the real betrayal" (Winston). Is this possible to do? What does Julia think?

 

11/12 University English

Discussion 10

Part 2, Chapter 8 & Half of 9

1. Why is Winston intimidated when he goes to O’Brien’s apartment?

2. Why do Winston and Julia go to O’Brien’s apartment?

3. What is the one thing that Julia and Winston are not prepared to do for the Brotherhood?

4. According to O’Brien, why can’t the Brotherhood ever be defeated? Do you agree?

5. What can conspirators in the Brotherhood expect to happen to them?

 

11/12 University English

Discussion 11

Part 2, Second Half of Chapter 9

1. Describe Hate Week.

2. What happens in mid-speech during Hate Week?

3. What are the three levels in all societies? How are they related?

4. According to Goldstein's book, what is the aim of modern warfare?

5. What are the two aims of the party?

6. "They can be granted intellectual liberty because they have no intellect." To whom is this quote referring?

 

11/12 University English

Discussion 12

Part 3, Chapters 1-2

1. How do you account for the differences between the prole and political prisoners in the holding cells?

2. Explain the circumstances of Parsons' arrest. How does this illustrate his utter stupidity?

3. What is Room 101?

4. What does O'Brien say is the matter with Winston?

5. Why does he say Winston was brought to the Ministry of Love?

6. According to O'Brien, what does two plus two equal?

 

11/12 University English

Discussion 13

Part 3, Chapters 3-6

1. According to O'Brien, why does the Party want to be in power?

2. Explain the statement "Slavery is Freedom".

3. According to what O'Brien tells Winston about controlling reality through controlling the mind, what is the answer to this question: If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?

4. According to Winston, what will defeat the Party in the end and what is O'Brien's response to this?

5. Winston: "To die hating them, that was freedom". Explain what this means.

6. What does Winston find in Room 101 and how does he react to it?

7. Why does Winston love Big Brother?

 

 

11/12 English
Seán's Class


Own Topic Journals

Length = 45 lines, full sentence and paragraph format, proofread.

You can write about any topic you want, but you must stay on that topic. That is, don’t wander from one topic to another. Instead, pick an issue and discuss it in two paragraphs.

Some students decide to write a poem or a short story and this is fine.

Other students have a hard time coming up with ideas. If you can’t think of a topic, you can choose from the list below:

1. Educational goals (3 paragraphs): What are your educational goals for this year? What might be some obstacles that may get in your way? What strategies can you use to overcome these obstacles?

2. The Best (3 paragraphs): The best movie you’ve seen. The best book you’ve read. The best music you’ve heard.

3. Controversial Issue (3 paragraphs): Pick an issue from the list below and present one side of the issue, the opposite view, and where you stand and why.
• Drugs
• War
• Abortion
• Capital Punishment
• Current issues: violence in schools, tasers, etc.
• Relationship Abuse
• “isms”: racism, sexism, classism, homophobia, etc.
• Native Rights


What I saw (or thought) on my way here today
The most important thing for me right now is ...
A dream (real or imaginary)
What would I do today with a) one hundred dollars b) one million dollars c) ten dollars
A most enjoyable day
A memorable person or an interesting character
What is the good life?
I don’t like ...
A favourite activity
I’m proud of myself because...
A wonderful day
My freedom is important to me
I worry about
A dream
What it is like to be old
A good friend
A false friend
A beautiful place
Money is a drug
My favourite part of Toronto
Doing the right thing
A very difficult person
Someone I admire
How children should be raised
How children should not be raised
What I want is ...
A season I like is ...
I (or we) shall overcome
One thing that makes me angry is ...
One thing that makes me happy is ...
Pets

The journal can describe your own life, dreams, or experiences. but does not have to. You can “make up “ responses to these ideas as if you were another person.

Quad 1 11/12 University English
Literature Response Topics

Nineteen Eighty-Four


Please write in complete sentences and paragraphs and write 45 lines.

1. From your knowledge of the society of Oceania in 1984 , describe what school would be like at Contact under such a system. Be imaginative, be creative!


2. You are Winston Smith. Explain why you hate Big Brother.


3. Do you think that there is any hope for change in Oceania? Explain.


4. Both Julia and Winston are rebels, but in different ways. Explain the similarities and differences in the way each character rebels.


5. You are O'Brien. Explain why you love Big Brother.

Quad 1 11/12 University English

Persuasive Essay Topics

Nineteen Eighty-Four

Length:
Grade 11 = 1,000 words
Grade 12 = 1,200 words

Answer ONE of the questions from below.
See CHECKLIST for requirements.

Discuss three ways the population is controlled in the novel and the extent that these methods are used for the same purposes today.

OR

How are fear and pain used to control the population in Oceania?

OR

3. Come up with your own topic, then get it approved by Seán.

11 English
Seán's Class

Gr. 11 Own Book Report


Please write 2.5 pages (75 lines) in complete sentences and paragraphs.
Each question should be answered in one paragraph.

1. Compare and contrast the two main characters in the book.

2. Briefly, describe the plot of the story, especially the key events (write one paragraph only).

3. What is the moral of the story? In short, what message does the author want to give to you, the reader?

4. Give three reasons why you liked or disliked the book.

5. Make up your own question about the book and answer it. (The question and answer are both important.)


11/12 English
Seán's Class

Film Review
Nineteen Eighty-Four


Please write in complete sentences and paragraphs.

Length = 60-90 lines.

1. Choose one character from the novel/film and discuss how each medium presents that character.

2. Choose an element of the plot from the story which is handled differently in each medium and say which you preferred and why.

3. Pick any theme from the novel/film and describe how each medium handled that particular theme.

4. Overall, which did you prefer - the novel or the film - and why?

Gr. 12 English Independent Study Unit Seán’s Class

Exploratory Reading:
1.Primary Sources:
* A minimum of two full length books or the equivalent should be read.
*At least one should be a novel. You may also read plays, poetry collections, articles, non-fiction books, biography/autobiography, etc.
* While reading, you should be considering an idea to shape into a thesis
for your essay.

2. Secondary Sources:
* These are readings about your books. A minimum of three items must be consulted.
*An important guideline: your own ideas before the critics.

3. Notes on your books:
Submit brief notes about the following topics for each of your books:
a) Main characters
b) Plot
c) Themes/Issues

Time Management
* Come prepared for conferences with work in progress and with specific proposals and questions for the teacher.
* Use class time productively.

Paper
* All steps of the writing process will be followed and submitted with the paper to be evaluated.
* See “ISU Checklist” sheet for those details.
* Length: College Level = 1200 words
University Level = 1500-2000 words.

Evaluation

Exploratory Reading, Log, Notes = 5 marks

Thesis, Plan, Draft = 5 marks

Essay = 20 marks

Total = 30 marks

Contact School

COURSE  ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION  OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE:

Grade 11 University English

   COURSE CODE:

ENG3U

COURSE TYPE/GRADE:

University/11

 CREDIT VALUE:

1

PREREQUISITE:

Gr. 10 Academic English

DATE:

2016-17

TEACHER NAME:

Seán Adams

PERIOD:

A

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and

creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will

analyse challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well

as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts

in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and

clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course

is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college

preparation course.

 

OVERALL CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS:

Oral Communication

1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety

of situations for a variety of purposes;

2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate

with different audiences for a variety of purposes;

3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers,

areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.

Reading and Literature Studies

1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of informational, literary,

and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;

2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements

and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;

3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.

Writing

1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write

for an intended purpose and audience;

2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational,

literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;

3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies,

and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work

effectively;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.

                                                                                                                                                                                               

Media Studies

1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;

2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and

explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning;

3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences,

using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters

and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding

and creating media texts.

 

ASSESSMENT:

Throughout the course, a range of instructional strategies will be used to address students’ needs.  Assessment is the onoing proces of gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources. Diagnostic assessments are used to identify students’ strengths and learning needs to assist with planning, modifying and adjusting instruction.  Formative assessments, which occur throughout the learning process, give students multiple opportunities to practice and receive feedback in an effort to improve their learning and achievement of the curriculum expectations.

EVALUATION:

Evaluation measures achievement of the overall curriculum expectations.  They are summative and usually take place at the end of important segments of learning (end of a unit, strand, term, semester), following student practice and constructive feedback.  Evaluations give students an opportunity to apply and demonstrate their learning based on established achievement criteria. 

Seventy per cent (70%) of the final grade will be based on the evaluations conducted during the course. There will be numerous and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four achievement categories according to the weighting described below.  Missed and/or incomplete assignments will have an impact on the final grade where there are a number of curriculum expectations that have not been evaluated because of missed assignments.

Thirty per cent (30%) of the final grade will be based on summative evaluation(s) administered towards the end of the course and following the same weighting of the achievement chart categories as the term evaluation.  All students must take part in the course-culminating activities that make up the 30% final evaluation mark. 

                                                                                                                       

WEIGHTING ACCORDING TO ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES:

Knowledge/Understanding

25

%

 Thinking

25

%

Communication

25

%

Application

25

%

LEARNING SKILLS:

There are six clusters of learning skills required for effective learning, achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success in and out of school: Responsibility, Independent Work, Organization, Initiative, Collaboration and Self-Regulation. 

LATE & MISSED ASSIGNMENTS:

Submitting course work on time is an important aspect of student learning and time management.  Students will be informed of due dates and ultimate deadlines, which is the last opportunity for students to submit an assignment for evaluation.  Late submissions will be reported as part of the learning skills on the report card and a variety of strategies will be used to encourage on-time submission of assignments including parent, student-teacher conferences, counselling, contracts, alternative assignments and extra help.  A mark deduction for late assignments up to and including the full value of the assignment may be used as a last resort.   

ACADEMIC HONESTY:  

Students are expected to be academically honest by submitting their own original work, and the marks they receive are intended to reflect their own academic achievement.  When evidence of dishonesty is confirmed, the incident and the consequences will be communicated to the principal/vice-principal, the student and parent(s)/guardian.

A mark of zero may be awarded for the assignment in question and a repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences.

COMMUNICATION:

Extra help will be available, including before classes, at lunch, and after school.                                                                

Phone calls home will be made regularly to discuss academics, attendance, punctuality or behaviour.

The teacher can be contacted at 416-393-1455.

Formal Parent/Teacher Meetings/Conferences will be twice a year. Upon request, meetings can be arranged at any time during the school year.

COURSE EVALUATION PLAN

30% Final Evaluations

EVALUATION TASKS

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

WEIGHTING (%)

Exams

K/U,  T, C, A

30

70% Course Work

UNIT SEQUENCE

TIMING

(Hrs or Dates)

EVALUATION TASK(S)

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

DUE DATE

Oral Communication

Each Quad

30 Hours

Literature and Media Oral Questions

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Reading and Literature Studies

Each Quad

30 Hours

Oral and Written Responses to Literature and Media

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Writing

Each Quad

30 Hours

Journals, Literature Responses, Reports, Essays, Media Responses, and Tests.

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly & End of Quad

Media Studies

Each Quad

20 Hours

Article and Film Analyses

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Contact School

COURSE  ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION  OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE:

Grade 12 University English

   COURSE CODE:

ENG4U

COURSE TYPE/GRADE:

University/12

 CREDIT VALUE:

1

PREREQUISITE:

Gr. 11 University English

DATE:

2016-17

TEACHER NAME:

Seán Adams

PERIOD:

A

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace.

 

 

 

 

OVERALL CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS:

Oral Communication

1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety

of situations for a variety of purposes;

2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate

with different audiences for a variety of purposes;

3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers,

areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.

Reading and Literature Studies

1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of informational, literary,

and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;

2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements

and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;

3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.

Writing

1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write

for an intended purpose and audience;

2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational,

literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;

3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies,

and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work

effectively;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.

 

Media Studies

1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;

2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning;

3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding and creating media texts.


ASSESSMENT:

Throughout the course, a range of instructional strategies will be used to address students’ needs.  Assessment is the onoing proces of gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources. Diagnostic assessments are used to identify students’ strengths and learning needs to assist with planning, modifying and adjusting instruction.  Formative assessments, which occur throughout the learning process, give students multiple opportunities to practice and receive feedback in an effort to improve their learning and achievement of the curriculum expectations.

EVALUATION:

Evaluation measures achievement of the overall curriculum expectations.  They are summative and usually take place at the end of important segments of learning (end of a unit, strand, term, semester), following student practice and constructive feedback.  Evaluations give students an opportunity to apply and demonstrate their learning based on established achievement criteria. 

Seventy per cent (70%) of the final grade will be based on the evaluations conducted during the course. There will be numerous and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four achievement categories according to the weighting described below.  Missed and/or incomplete assignments will have an impact on the final grade where there are a number of curriculum expectations that have not been evaluated because of missed assignments.

Thirty per cent (30%) of the final grade will be based on summative evaluation(s) administered towards the end of the course and following the same weighting of the achievement chart categories as the term evaluation.  All students must take part in the course-culminating activities that make up the 30% final evaluation mark. 

                                                                                                                       

WEIGHTING ACCORDING TO ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES:

Knowledge/Understanding

25

%

 Thinking

25

%

Communication

25

%

Application

25

%


LEARNING SKILLS:

There are six clusters of learning skills required for effective learning, achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success in and out of school: Responsibility, Independent Work, Organization, Initiative, Collaboration and Self-Regulation. 

LATE & MISSED ASSIGNMENTS:

Submitting course work on time is an important aspect of student learning and time management.  Students will be informed of due dates and ultimate deadlines, which is the last opportunity for students to submit an assignment for evaluation.  Late submissions will be reported as part of the learning skills on the report card and a variety of strategies will be used to encourage on-time submission of assignments including parent, student-teacher conferences, counselling, contracts, alternative assignments and extra help.  A mark deduction for late assignments up to and including the full value of the assignment may be used as a last resort.   

ACADEMIC HONESTY:  

Students are expected to be academically honest by submitting their own original work, and the marks they receive are intended to reflect their own academic achievement.  When evidence of dishonesty is confirmed, the incident and the consequences will be communicated to the principal/vice-principal, the student and parent(s)/guardian.

A mark of zero may be awarded for the assignment in question and a repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences.

COMMUNICATION:

 

Extra help will be available, including before classes, at lunch, and after school.                                                               

Phone calls home will be made regularly to discuss academics, attendance, punctuality or behaviour.

The teacher can be contacted at 416-393-1455.

Formal Parent/Teacher Meetings/Conferences will be twice a year. Upon request, meetings can be arranged at any time during the school year.

 

COURSE EVALUATION PLAN

30% Final Evaluations

EVALUATION TASKS

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

WEIGHTING (%)

Exams

K/U,  T, C, A

30

70% Course Work

UNIT SEQUENCE

TIMING

(Hrs or Dates)

EVALUATION TASK(S)

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

DUE DATE

Oral Communication

Each Quad

30 Hours

Literature and Media Oral Questions

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Reading and Literature Studies

Each Quad

30 Hours

Oral and Written Responses to Literature and Media

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Writing

Each Quad

30 Hours

Journals, Literature Responses, Reports, Essays, Media Responses, and Tests.

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly & End of Quad

Media Studies

Each Quad

20 Hours

Article and Film Analyses

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly