11/12 UniversityEnglish

Quad 2

 

The audio files below are a full and complete

version of the novel

 

Disc 1

 

Disc 2

 

Disc 3

 

 

Disc 4

 

Disc 5

 

Disc 6

 

Disc 7

 

Disc 8

 

Disc 9

 

Disc 10

 

 

 

 

Note:

The audio files below are a shortened version of the novel

Part 1

 

Part 2

 

Part 3

 

Part 4

 

Part 5

 

 

 

 

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Quad 2 Dates

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11/12 University English
Discussion Questions

 

Discussion 1

Articles 1 and 2

Article 1

1. Once the Taliban took over, what happened to girls in school and women in the workplace?

2. What are the names and former occupations of the three women featured in this article?

3. According to the group "Women Living Under Muslim Laws", is the Taliban's rule based on religion? (p. 27).

Article 2

1. What do you think is the most disturbing thing in this article?

2. In war, why are women targeted and sexually assaulted?

 

Discussion 2

Articles 3 and 4

Article 3

1. Who did christian fundamentalists like Jerry Falwell and Pat Robertson blame for the 9/11 attacks?

2. According to these men, what is the connection between the perceived "sins" of Americans and god letting 9/11 happen?

3. Why is this thinking dangerous?

Article 4

1. What do you think is the most disturbing thing in this article?

2. In war, why are women targeted and sexually assaulted?

 

Discussion 3

Chapters 1 and 2

 

1. Outline the setting of the novel (place, time period, initial characters).

2. What precautions have been taken to prevent suicide in the Commander's house?

3. Why does the Handmaid "try not to think too much"?

4. List some of the clues that all is not well in the narrator's life.

5. How is the quote from Genesis related to the title of the book?

Study Guide

Chronology of the Handmaid's Life

In the Past (dialogue has no quotes)
1. When she was a child with her mother.
2. With Moira in university.
3. As an adult with Luke and then her daughter.
4. As a Handmaid in the Red Centre (recent past).

At Present (dialogue has quotes)
As Offred in the Commander's House

 

Discussion 4

Chapters 3-8

1. What is the power relationship between the Handmaid and Serena Joy?

2. The Handmaid: "So it was worse than I thought." (Last line of chapter 3). What does she mean by this?

3. Read the first paragraph of chapter 4 as if it were a poem. How do the symbolism and metaphors relate to the Handmaid?

4. Who are Ofglen, Ofwarren and Offred?

5. What are the two kinds of freedom? (Chapter 5.)

6. What answer does the Handmaid give to the Japanese tourist's question? Why? (End of chapter 5.)

7. What are the typical "crimes" of people hanging from hooks on the wall?

8. Who are Luke and Moira?

9. Besides Luke, who did the Handmaid lose once she became a Handmaid?

 

Discussion 5

Chapters 9-13

1. Who wrote "Nolite te bastardes carborundorum"?

2. In chapter 10, Atwood writes two scenes, back to back, featuring Aunt Lydia, followed by Moira. Why are these two scenes juxtaposed in this way?

3. In chapter 11, what does the doctor offer to do? What are his motives?

4. Why is the supermarket incident such an effective use of the foreshadowing technique? (Chapter 12.)

5. What happens to Janine when she is "testifying" in chapter 13?

6. Read the last line of chapter 13. What is she dreaming about and why is it the worst?

 

Discussion 6

Chapters 14-19

1. How Gilead racist as well as sexist? Hint: "Children of Ham" is a biblical reference to African-Americans. (Chapter 14.)

2. What is the power relationship between the Commander and the Handmaid?

3. How are the two attempted escapes in chapters 14 and 15 different from each other?

4. Describe the "Ceremony" in chapter 16. In your view, is it rape?

5. Read the last line of chapter 16. What is your answer?

6. Who is Nick? (Chapter 17.)

7. Explain how the Handmaid could believe three different versions of Luke's fate. (Chapter 18.)

8. What is an "Unbaby"? (Chapter 19.)

9. In what way is Janine being abused in chapter 19 similar to what she revealed when she was testifying in chapter 13?

 

Discussion 7

Chapters 20-23

1. Red Centre slogan: "From each according to her ability; to each according to his needs". Explain how Atwood changes the pronouns from the original quote popularized by Karl Marx in 1875 and how the new meaning relates to Gilead. (Chapter 20.)

2. When the Handmaid's mom says "...what use are they except for ten seconds' worth of half babies", to whom is she referring? How do we know this is a tongue in cheek comment? (Chapter 20.)

3. How is Moira's second escape attempt different from her first? (Chapter 22.)

4. What is an "Unwoman"? (Chapters 21 and 23.)

5. What do the Handmaid and the Commander do in his office? (Chapter 23.)

6. At the end of chapter 23, the Handmaid describes a fantasy. What is this fantasy? Why doesn't she actually have this fantasy?

 

Discussion 8

Chapters 24 - 27

1. Why does Atwood include the story of the Nazi leader and his mistress in chapter 24?

2. Why does the Handmaid have an outburst of laughter at the end of chapter 24 and how is this related to the story about the Nazi?

3. We get a hint as to the reason the Commander wants the Handmaid in his office in chapter 25 and again near the end of chapter 26. What is the reason?

4. Near the beginning of chapter 26, the Handmaid has three different feelings about Serena Joy. What are they?

5. How does the Ceremony change for the Commander after he sees the Hanmaid in his office a few times?

6. What does Ofglen reveal to the Handmaid in chapter 27?

 

Discussion 9

Chapters 28-30

1. In chapter 28 we get some details about the coup that overthrew the American government. Describe how this happened and explain why it was so easy to pull off.

2. How did the coup affect the Handmaid personally? (Chapter 28.)

3. In chapter 29 we find out what "Nolite te bastardes carborundorum" means. Why did the previous Handmaid write it?

4. How did the Handmaid, Luke, and their daughter get caught when they tried to escape to Canada? (Chapter 30.)

5. The Handmaid asks herself at the end of chapter 30, "How can I keep on living?". What keeps her going?

 

Discussion 10

Chapters 31-35

1. In chapter 31, what is the plan that Serena Joy concocts to get the Handmaid pregnant? How did Janine get pregnant?

2. In chapter 32, what do we learn about the Commander?

3. How does Janine react to her child being declared an "Unbaby"? Why does she start to lose her mind while at the Red Centre? (Chapter 33.)

4. What is the rationale, according to the Commander, for arranged marriages? (Chapter 34.)

5. How does the Handmaid react to seeing the photo of her daughter? (Chapter 35.)

 

Discussion 11

Chapters 36-39

1. What is Jezebel's? What is ironic about its location? (Chapter 37.)

2. Give some examples of hypocrisy in the Commander's character. (Chapters 36 and 37.)

3. Who are the women that work at Jezebel's? (Chapter 37.)

4. Who helped Moira escape on the Underground Femaleroad? (Chapter 38.)

5. Why was Moira sterilized? Why is this ironic? (Chapter 38.)

6. What disappoints the Handmaid about Moira? (Chapter 38.)

7. What is the fate of the Handmaid's mother? (Chapter 39.)

8. At the end of chapter 39, the Commander says to the Handmaid that "I thought you might enjoy it for a change." What does he mean by this and is he really showing that he cares for her?

 

Discussion 12

Chapters 40-45

1. Why does the Handmaid think that having sex with Nick is betrayal? (Chapter 40 and 41.)

2. What is a Women's Salvaging? (Chapter 42.)

3. What is a Particicution? How does it affect Janine? (Chapter 43.)

4. What is Ofglen's fate? (Chapter 44.)

5. Read the first page of chapter 45. What is the "true power" they have over the Handmaids?

6. Why is it hypocritical for Serena Joy to blame the Handmaid for going out with the Commander? (Chapter 45.)

 

Discussion 13

Chapters 46 - End

1. The Handmaid waits in her room and considers 7 options. Which one does she choose and why? (Chapter 46.)

2. How do we know that the Handmaid was rescued from the Commander's house by the Mayday Underground? (Historical Notes.)

3. When were the Historical Notes written? What has happened to Gilead by this time? (Historical Notes)

 

 

11/12 English
Seán's Class


Own Topic Journals

Length = 45 lines, full sentence and paragraph format, proofread.

You can write about any topic you want, but you must stay on that topic. That is, don’t wander from one topic to another. Instead, pick an issue and discuss it in two paragraphs.

Some students decide to write a poem or a short story and this is fine.

Other students have a hard time coming up with ideas. If you can’t think of a topic, you can choose from the list below:

1. Educational goals (3 paragraphs): What are your educational goals for this year? What might be some obstacles that may get in your way? What strategies can you use to overcome these obstacles?

2. The Best (3 paragraphs): The best movie you’ve seen. The best book you’ve read. The best music you’ve heard.

3. Controversial Issue (3 paragraphs): Pick an issue from the list below and present one side of the issue, the opposite view, and where you stand and why.
• Drugs
• War
• Abortion
• Capital Punishment
• Current issues: violence in schools, tasers, etc.
• Relationship Abuse
• “isms”: racism, sexism, classism, homophobia, etc.
• Native Rights


What I saw (or thought) on my way here today
The most important thing for me right now is ...
A dream (real or imaginary)
What would I do today with a) one hundred dollars b) one million dollars c) ten dollars
A most enjoyable day
A memorable person or an interesting character
What is the good life?
I don’t like ...
A favourite activity
I’m proud of myself because...
A wonderful day
My freedom is important to me
I worry about
A dream
What it is like to be old
A good friend
A false friend
A beautiful place
Money is a drug
My favourite part of Toronto
Doing the right thing
A very difficult person
Someone I admire
How children should be raised
How children should not be raised
What I want is ...
A season I like is ...
I (or we) shall overcome
One thing that makes me angry is ...
One thing that makes me happy is ...
Pets

The journal can describe your own life, dreams, or experiences. but does not have to. You can “make up “ responses to these ideas as if you were another person.

Quad 2 11/12English Seán’s Class

Article Questions

1. Define the following terms: a) fundamentalism, b) misogyny, c) secular, d) www.rawa.org
2. Describe how life has changed for women in Afghanistan after the Taliban came to power in 1996.

Literature Response Topics

Pick 4 of the following topics for your 4 Literature Responses.
Length = 45 lines.

1. By all appearances, the living conditions of the Handmaid are quite pleasant and appealing. But beneath the surface something is dreadfully wrong. Describe what you know about the Handmaid's living conditions - both the apparent and the hidden- and explain why precautions have been taken to avoid the escape of suicide.

OR (if you have read 1984)

Compare and contrast the living conditions of Winston Smith with those of the Handmaid. Mention the aspects that are different, but don't leave out the similarities.

2. Considering the lives of Serena Joy and the Handmaid, is the position of women better or worse now compared to before the coup?

3. Not much is said about men in this book. Describe what you think they might be taught in Gilead, especially about women in this society.
Optional supplementary question: How does this compare to the messages men are given about women in our society today?

4. In the novel, women are defined by their bodies. To what extent is this true in our society today?

5. Compare Aunt Lydia and the Handmaid's mother in terms of their views on women and men.

6. Winston Smith was rarely alone in the novel 1984. In contrast, the Handmaid spends most of her time alone. Explain how both situations are used to control each of the characters.

7. On page 274, the Handmaid contemplates seven options while she is waiting to meet her fate. Which do you think would have been the best choice and why did she decide not to choose any of them? Remember, she didn't know what would happen to her and supposed the worst.

Quad 2 11/12 English Seán’s Class

Persuasive Essay Topics

Answer ONE of the following questions in an organized essay of 1000 words (gr. 11) or 1,200 words (gr. 12).

1. "Nothing changes instantaneously: in a gradually heating bathtub you'd be boiled to death before you knew it" (The Handmaid's Tale, p. 53). In the novel, we come to understand Gilead's progression from democracy to totalitarianism. Describe this gradual progression and relate it to trends in our present day society.

2. "To institutue an effective totalitarian system or indeed any system at all you must offer some benefits and freedoms, at least to a priviledged few, in return for those you remove" (The Handmaid's Tale, p. 290). To what extent is this true in the novel?

3. "Mother, I think. Wherever you may be. Can you hear me? You wanted a women's culture, well, now there is one. It isn't what you meant, but it exists. Be thankful for small mercies" (The Handmaid's Tale, p. 137). What is the distinction between the Aunts' and feminists' (like Offred's mother) vision of a women's culture.

4. Compare the themes of 1984 with those of The Handmaid's Tale.

5. Come up with your own question relating to the novel, get it approved by Seán, start writing.

NOTES:
1. Always use specific details from the novel to back up your views.
2. Underline or italicize the book title. Example: The Handmaid’s Tale or TThe Handmaid’s Tale.
3. When you quote from the text, it is sufficient for this term paper to put the page number in brackets at the end of your sentence. Example: (p. 214).

11 English
Seán's Class

Gr. 11 Own Book Report


Please write 2.5 pages (75 lines) in complete sentences and paragraphs.
Each question should be answered in one paragraph.

1. Compare and contrast the two main characters in the book.

2. Briefly, describe the plot of the story, especially the key events (write one paragraph only).

3. What is the moral of the story? In short, what message does the author want to give to you, the reader?

4. Give three reasons why you liked or disliked the book.

5. Make up your own question about the book and answer it. (The question and answer are both important.)


Quad 2 11/12 English Seán’s Class

Film Review
The Handmaid’s Tale


Please write in complete sentences and paragraphs and write 60-80 lines.

1. In the film, some major changes are made in the plot. Evaluate two of these changes.

2. Choose two characters from the novel/film and discuss how each medium presents that character.

3. The novel and film end very differently. Which do you prefer and why?

Gr. 12 English Independent Study Unit Seán’s Class

Exploratory Reading:
1.Primary Sources:
* A minimum of two full length books or the equivalent should be read.
*At least one should be a novel. You may also read plays, poetry collections, articles, non-fiction books, biography/autobiography, etc.
* While reading, you should be considering an idea to shape into a thesis
for your essay.

2. Secondary Sources:
* These are readings about your books. A minimum of three items must be consulted.
*An important guideline: your own ideas before the critics.

3. Notes on your books:
Submit brief notes about the following topics for each of your books:
a) Main characters
b) Plot
c) Themes/Issues

Time Management
* Come prepared for conferences with work in progress and with specific proposals and questions for the teacher.
* Use class time productively.

Paper
* All steps of the writing process will be followed and submitted with the paper to be evaluated.
* See “ISU Checklist” sheet for those details.
* Length: College Level = 1200 words
University Level = 1500-2000 words.

Evaluation

Exploratory Reading, Log, Notes = 5 marks

Thesis, Plan, Draft = 5 marks

Essay = 20 marks

Total = 30 marks

Contact School

COURSE  ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION  OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE:

Grade 11 University English

   COURSE CODE:

ENG3U

COURSE TYPE/GRADE:

University/11

 CREDIT VALUE:

1

PREREQUISITE:

Gr. 10 Academic English

DATE:

2016-2017

TEACHER NAME:

Seán Adams

PERIOD:

A

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and

creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will

analyse challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well

as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts

in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and

clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course

is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college

preparation course.

 

OVERALL CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS:

Oral Communication

1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety

of situations for a variety of purposes;

2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate

with different audiences for a variety of purposes;

3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers,

areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.

Reading and Literature Studies

1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of informational, literary,

and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;

2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements

and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;

3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.

Writing

1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write

for an intended purpose and audience;

2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational,

literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;

3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies,

and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work

effectively;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.

                                                                                                                                                                                               

Media Studies

1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;

2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and

explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning;

3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences,

using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters

and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding

and creating media texts.

 

ASSESSMENT:

Throughout the course, a range of instructional strategies will be used to address students’ needs.  Assessment is the onoing proces of gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources. Diagnostic assessments are used to identify students’ strengths and learning needs to assist with planning, modifying and adjusting instruction.  Formative assessments, which occur throughout the learning process, give students multiple opportunities to practice and receive feedback in an effort to improve their learning and achievement of the curriculum expectations.

EVALUATION:

Evaluation measures achievement of the overall curriculum expectations.  They are summative and usually take place at the end of important segments of learning (end of a unit, strand, term, semester), following student practice and constructive feedback.  Evaluations give students an opportunity to apply and demonstrate their learning based on established achievement criteria. 

Seventy per cent (70%) of the final grade will be based on the evaluations conducted during the course. There will be numerous and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four achievement categories according to the weighting described below.  Missed and/or incomplete assignments will have an impact on the final grade where there are a number of curriculum expectations that have not been evaluated because of missed assignments.

Thirty per cent (30%) of the final grade will be based on summative evaluation(s) administered towards the end of the course and following the same weighting of the achievement chart categories as the term evaluation.  All students must take part in the course-culminating activities that make up the 30% final evaluation mark. 

                                                                                                                       

WEIGHTING ACCORDING TO ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES:

Knowledge/Understanding

25

%

 Thinking

25

%

Communication

25

%

Application

25

%

LEARNING SKILLS:

There are six clusters of learning skills required for effective learning, achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success in and out of school: Responsibility, Independent Work, Organization, Initiative, Collaboration and Self-Regulation. 

LATE & MISSED ASSIGNMENTS:

Submitting course work on time is an important aspect of student learning and time management.  Students will be informed of due dates and ultimate deadlines, which is the last opportunity for students to submit an assignment for evaluation.  Late submissions will be reported as part of the learning skills on the report card and a variety of strategies will be used to encourage on-time submission of assignments including parent, student-teacher conferences, counselling, contracts, alternative assignments and extra help.  A mark deduction for late assignments up to and including the full value of the assignment may be used as a last resort.   

ACADEMIC HONESTY:  

Students are expected to be academically honest by submitting their own original work, and the marks they receive are intended to reflect their own academic achievement.  When evidence of dishonesty is confirmed, the incident and the consequences will be communicated to the principal/vice-principal, the student and parent(s)/guardian.

A mark of zero may be awarded for the assignment in question and a repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences.

COMMUNICATION:

Extra help will be available, including before classes, at lunch, and after school.                                                                

Phone calls home will be made regularly to discuss academics, attendance, punctuality or behaviour.

The teacher can be contacted at 416-393-1455.

Formal Parent/Teacher Meetings/Conferences will be twice a year. Upon request, meetings can be arranged at any time during the school year.

COURSE EVALUATION PLAN

30% Final Evaluations

EVALUATION TASKS

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

WEIGHTING (%)

Exams

K/U,  T, C, A

30

70% Course Work

UNIT SEQUENCE

TIMING

(Hrs or Dates)

EVALUATION TASK(S)

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

DUE DATE

Oral Communication

Each Quad

30 Hours

Literature and Media Oral Questions

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Reading and Literature Studies

Each Quad

30 Hours

Oral and Written Responses to Literature and Media

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Writing

Each Quad

30 Hours

Journals, Literature Responses, Reports, Essays, Media Responses, and Tests.

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly & End of Quad

Media Studies

Each Quad

20 Hours

Article and Film Analyses

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Contact School

COURSE  ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION  OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE:

Grade 12 University English

   COURSE CODE:

ENG4U

COURSE TYPE/GRADE:

University/12

 CREDIT VALUE:

1

PREREQUISITE:

Gr. 11 University English

DATE:

2016-2017

TEACHER NAME:

Seán Adams

PERIOD:

A

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace.

 

 

OVERALL CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS:

Oral Communication

1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety

of situations for a variety of purposes;

2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate

with different audiences for a variety of purposes;

3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers,

areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.

Reading and Literature Studies

1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of informational, literary,

and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;

2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements

and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;

3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.

Writing

1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write

for an intended purpose and audience;

2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational,

literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;

3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies,

and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work

effectively;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.

 

Media Studies

1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;

2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning;

3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding and creating media texts.


ASSESSMENT:

Throughout the course, a range of instructional strategies will be used to address students’ needs.  Assessment is the onoing proces of gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources. Diagnostic assessments are used to identify students’ strengths and learning needs to assist with planning, modifying and adjusting instruction.  Formative assessments, which occur throughout the learning process, give students multiple opportunities to practice and receive feedback in an effort to improve their learning and achievement of the curriculum expectations.

EVALUATION:

Evaluation measures achievement of the overall curriculum expectations.  They are summative and usually take place at the end of important segments of learning (end of a unit, strand, term, semester), following student practice and constructive feedback.  Evaluations give students an opportunity to apply and demonstrate their learning based on established achievement criteria. 

Seventy per cent (70%) of the final grade will be based on the evaluations conducted during the course. There will be numerous and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four achievement categories according to the weighting described below.  Missed and/or incomplete assignments will have an impact on the final grade where there are a number of curriculum expectations that have not been evaluated because of missed assignments.

Thirty per cent (30%) of the final grade will be based on summative evaluation(s) administered towards the end of the course and following the same weighting of the achievement chart categories as the term evaluation.  All students must take part in the course-culminating activities that make up the 30% final evaluation mark. 

                                                                                                                       

WEIGHTING ACCORDING TO ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES:

Knowledge/Understanding

25

%

 Thinking

25

%

Communication

25

%

Application

25

%


LEARNING SKILLS:

There are six clusters of learning skills required for effective learning, achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success in and out of school: Responsibility, Independent Work, Organization, Initiative, Collaboration and Self-Regulation. 

LATE & MISSED ASSIGNMENTS:

Submitting course work on time is an important aspect of student learning and time management.  Students will be informed of due dates and ultimate deadlines, which is the last opportunity for students to submit an assignment for evaluation.  Late submissions will be reported as part of the learning skills on the report card and a variety of strategies will be used to encourage on-time submission of assignments including parent, student-teacher conferences, counselling, contracts, alternative assignments and extra help.  A mark deduction for late assignments up to and including the full value of the assignment may be used as a last resort.   

ACADEMIC HONESTY:  

Students are expected to be academically honest by submitting their own original work, and the marks they receive are intended to reflect their own academic achievement.  When evidence of dishonesty is confirmed, the incident and the consequences will be communicated to the principal/vice-principal, the student and parent(s)/guardian.

A mark of zero may be awarded for the assignment in question and a repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences.

COMMUNICATION:

 

Extra help will be available, including before classes, at lunch, and after school.                                                               

Phone calls home will be made regularly to discuss academics, attendance, punctuality or behaviour.

The teacher can be contacted at 416-393-1455.

Formal Parent/Teacher Meetings/Conferences will be twice a year. Upon request, meetings can be arranged at any time during the school year.

 

COURSE EVALUATION PLAN

30% Final Evaluations

EVALUATION TASKS

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

WEIGHTING (%)

Exams

K/U,  T, C, A

30

70% Course Work

UNIT SEQUENCE

TIMING

(Hrs or Dates)

EVALUATION TASK(S)

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

DUE DATE

Oral Communication

Each Quad

30 Hours

Literature and Media Oral Questions

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Reading and Literature Studies

Each Quad

30 Hours

Oral and Written Responses to Literature and Media

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Writing

Each Quad

30 Hours

Journals, Literature Responses, Reports, Essays, Media Responses, and Tests.

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly & End of Quad

Media Studies

Each Quad

20 Hours

Article and Film Analyses

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly