11/12 University English

Quad 4

 

 

 

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Quad 4 Dates

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Discussion 1
Still Mine

P. 1-29

1. What is the setting of the novel?

2. Who are the following characters?
a) Clare O’Dey
b) Christopher
c) Jason
d) Malcolm Boon
e) Shayna Cunningham Fowles
f) Jared Fowles
g) Wilfred Cunningham
h) Louise Cunningham
i) Donna
j) Charlie Merritt

3. On pages 1 and 19 (the pages with a tree graphic), who is the narrator?

4. How are Shayna and Clare similar?

5. From what or whom is Shayna running?

6. From what or whom is Clare running?

Discussion 2
Still Mine

P. 30-61

1. Is Clare suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)? Give examples.

2. How does Clare interpret the cougar story that Louise tells her?

3. Different family members don’t approve of both Shayna’s and Clare’s husbands? Who are these family members in each case?

4. What do the photos of Shayna when she was 19 and Clare when she was 17 reveal about the life trajectories of both characters?

5. Why is Clare so familiar with the injection marks on Sara Gorman’s forearm?

6. What are “death bunnies”?

7. Why doesn’t Clare’s mother know the truth about Clare’s relationship with her husband Jason?

 

Discussion 3
Still Mine

P. 62-85

1. Clare meets Jared Fowles for the first time in this chapter. Describe your impressions of him?

2. Why do Charlie and Wilfred get into a fight?

3. Why doesn’t Clare call the police to get help in stopping the fight?

4. What addiction do Clare and Sara have in common?

5. Why was Sara not surprised by Shayna’s disappearance and possible death?

6. How is the mine disaster a metaphor for the dysfunction in the community of Blackmore?

Discussion 4
Still Mine

P. 89-117

1. When Clare meets Malcolm, what is the question she repeatedly asks him?

2. Although Clare doesn’t reveal it to Malcolm, we find out about “the unwanted stabs of warmth that both Jared and Charlie seem to stir in her” (p. 94). Evaluate Clare’s attraction to these two men.

3. Why did Clare take the job, offered by Malcolm, to look for Shayna Fowles?

4. Why does Clare offer to help Wilfred look after Louise?

5. Why is Sara not interested in rehab for her drug addiction?

6. According to Charlie’s civil lawsuit, who owns the Cunningham’s land?

7. Why does Clare take the drugs that Charlie offers her?

 

Discussion 5
Still Mine

P. 118-153

1. At the homecoming party at Ray’s Bar, in what way does Clare start to fill the vacancy created by Shayna’s absence?

2. Who are the three people who warn Clare that she’s headed for trouble on the night of the party and during the parade the next day? What are they concerned about?

3. It is revealed in Clare’s memory flashback who Malcolm is working for when he tracks her down. Who is this and why is it significant?

4. Why does Malcolm give back Clare’s gun to her?

5. What do we learn about Wilfred from Shayna’s memory of the time he pulled a dead body from the river?

6. Both Charlie and Jared have motives for killing Shayna. What are they?

7. What is Jared’s theory regarding what happened to Shayna?

8. Why does Clare feel a sense of impending doom at the end of the chapter?

 

Discussion 6
Still Mine
P. 154-179

1. In the hospital, Jared and Derek immediately begin to argue and insult each other. What are they fighting about?

2. What major life decision does Clare make as her mother is dying of cancer?

3. What are Jason’s two types of responses when Clare says she is going to leave him?

4. What is the underlying reason for Wilfred’s harsh words and actions directed at his wife and daughter?

5. What role does Clare’s friend Grace have in Clare’s life?

6. What role does Charlie have in Sara’s life?

7. What negative details are revealed about Shayna’s relationships with others?

8. Describe how Clare loses her baby late in her pregnancy.

 

Discussion 7
Still Mine

P. 180-211

1. What information does Malcolm obtain about Charlie and how is it related to Shayna’s possible murder?

2. Malcolm asks Clare if Shayna was murdered, then who did it. What does Clare think and say to Malcolm?

3. We get the details of how (if not why) Malcolm hired Clare to search for Shayna in Blackmore. Describe how this comes about.

4. What do we learn about Shayna’s relationship with Charlie on page 191?

5. Describe the contradictory feelings Clare had for Jason when she first started to run away from him.

6. Describe the details of the mine explosion that Jared reveals to Clare and how they relate to the “war” between Charlie and Wilfred.

7. Jared repeatedly tells Clare that he didn’t kill his wife Shayna. What theory does he have to explain her disappearance?


Discussion 8
Still Mine
P. 212-239

1. After Blackmore fell apart following the mine explosion, why doesn’t Dr. Derek Meyer leave town like so many others did?

2. If Steve Gorman knows that Charlie is a drug dealer and is bad for his daughter-in-law Sara, why doesn’t he call the police on Charlie?

3. What is the significance of the book and letters that Clare finds in Louise’s purse?

4. Why does Clare unlock the restraints holding Louise to her hospital bed?

5. Why do Jared and Derek fight?

6. Why does Clare take the pill that Charlie gives her?

7. Describe how Clare and Jared become closer.

8. In the letter on p. 239, Shayna feared that Derek never searched for her at all. Is this fear justified?

 


Discussion 9
Still Mine
P. 243-275

1. In a flashback scene, Clare remembers pointing a shotgun at her brother. Why did she do this?

2. Why doesn't Clare want to be extracted by Malcolm?

3. Why does Clare fight Malcolm for his cell phone?

4. Clare finally finds out why Malcolm hired her instead of turning her in. What is the reason?

5. How does Clare figure out where Shayna is?

6. What are the reasons that Steve wants Charlie dead?

7. In the armed standoff at the mine, Clare doesn't run in the face of fear and danger. Describe how this new version of Clare is different than the old version.

8. How is Clare’s behaviour at the armed standoff at the mine different than Steve’s?


Discussion 10
Still Mine
P. 276-305

1. Why did Wilfred imprison his own daughter in the egress tunnel?

2. Why are Shayna’s and Clare’s pleas to Wilfred to let them out of the tunnel not successful?

3. How do Shayna’s feelings of what her father did to her differ from those of Derek?

4. In the letter on p. 239, Shayna feared that Derek never searched for her at all. Is this fear justified?

5. Is Jared right about Clare when he says, “You’re a cold one…Whatever it takes to get what you need” (p. 290)?

6. Malcolm always had three options once he found Clare:
a) turn her in to his client, b) let her go, c) give her “another way out”.
Why does he go with option (c)?

7. Why do you think Clare reads the letter from Jason and what do you think is her reaction to it?

8. Is Jason’s refusal to give up on finding Clare based on love and concern for his missing wife, or on his obsession for dominance, power, and control over her?

 

 

 

11/12 English
Seán's Class


Own Topic Journals

Length = 45 lines, full sentence and paragraph format, proofread.

You can write about any topic you want, but you must stay on that topic. That is, don’t wander from one topic to another. Instead, pick an issue and discuss it in two paragraphs.

Some students decide to write a poem or a short story and this is fine.

Other students have a hard time coming up with ideas. If you can’t think of a topic, you can choose from the list below:

1. Educational goals (3 paragraphs): What are your educational goals for this year? What might be some obstacles that may get in your way? What strategies can you use to overcome these obstacles?

2. The Best (3 paragraphs): The best movie you’ve seen. The best book you’ve read. The best music you’ve heard.

3. Controversial Issue (3 paragraphs): Pick an issue from the list below and present one side of the issue, the opposite view, and where you stand and why.
• Drugs
• War
• Abortion
• Capital Punishment
• Current issues: violence in schools, tasers, etc.
• Relationship Abuse
• “isms”: racism, sexism, classism, homophobia, etc.
• Native Rights


What I saw (or thought) on my way here today
The most important thing for me right now is ...
A dream (real or imaginary)
What would I do today with a) one hundred dollars b) one million dollars c) ten dollars
A most enjoyable day
A memorable person or an interesting character
What is the good life?
I don’t like ...
A favourite activity
I’m proud of myself because...
A wonderful day
My freedom is important to me
I worry about
A dream
What it is like to be old
A good friend
A false friend
A beautiful place
Money is a drug
My favourite part of Toronto
Doing the right thing
A very difficult person
Someone I admire
How children should be raised
How children should not be raised
What I want is ...
A season I like is ...
I (or we) shall overcome
One thing that makes me angry is ...
One thing that makes me happy is ...
Pets

The journal can describe your own life, dreams, or experiences. but does not have to. You can “make up “ responses to these ideas as if you were another person.

Quad 4 11/12 English Seán’s Class

Literature Response Topics
Please write 45 lines in complete sentence and paragraph structure.
Pick any 5 from the list below.

 

1. Discuss the issue of relationship abuse, the early warning signs, and the reasons women stay with abusive partners.

2. Compare and contrast Clare and Shayna.

3. What do the photos of Shayna when she was 19 and Clare when she was 17 reveal about the life trajectories of both characters? Where do you see yourself being in 10 years?

4. Describe the hostile relationship between Charlie and Wilfred. How does it manifest itself? What are the causes of the conflict? Why did they want to see each other dead?

5. Evaluate Clare’s behaviour in Blackmore, including her actions that you see as positive and negative. What do her actions reveal about her character?

6. Compare and contrast Clare from Still Mine and Beth from “Once Were Warriors”.

7. Examine the issue of drug and alcohol abuse and how it effects two characters from the novel. What is the cost of oblivion or sedation as a coping mechanism?

8. Analyse the character Dr. Derek Meyers. What doesn’t he get about addiction, compassion, and love?

9. Considering Clare’s decision to leave art school and marry Jason, how much does one decision alter a life? You can discuss Clare, yourself, or someone you know in your response.

10. Can Clare ever truly escape Jason - physically, emotionally and psychologically?

 

 


Film Review

“Once Were Warriors”

Please write in complete sentences and paragraphs and write 60-80 lines.

1. Why is Beth attracted to Jake?

2. Is Jake a strong, tough man or a weak coward? Discuss.

3. Why does Beth decide to stop partying and change her life around?

4. How is Jake still a slave?

5. From where does Beth get her strength?

11 English
Seán's Class

Gr. 11 Own Book Report


Please write 2.5 pages (75 lines) in complete sentences and paragraphs.
Each question should be answered in one paragraph.

1. Compare and contrast the two main characters in the book.

2. Briefly, describe the plot of the story, especially the key events (write one paragraph only).

3. What is the moral of the story? In short, what message does the author want to give to you, the reader?

4. Give three reasons why you liked or disliked the book.

5. Make up your own question about the book and answer it. (The question and answer are both important.)


Persuasive Essay Topics

Still Mine

Answer ONE of the following questions in an organized essay of 1000 words (Grade 11) or 1,200 words (Grade 12).

1. Examine the dynamics of female-male relationships in the novel. How would you characterize them? Are they equal? Is there a sense of dominance and power of one over the other? How do the female characters respond?

2. Some readers view the main character, Clare, in a negative light and think that the author took a risk by not presenting the protagonist in a more sympathetic way. Do you view Clare as a hero or anti-hero protagonist?

3. Describe Clare’s struggles to be free - both from Jason and her own inner demons. Is there growth in that struggle throughout the novel?

4. In Blackmore, Clare thinks about past versions of herself. There is the seventeen-year-old Clare, happy with her best friend Grace. There is the married Clare, locked in the cellar contemplating suicide. What version of Clare do we see at the beginning of the book? At the end? How are they different?

5. Analyse Shayna’s letters. What perspective did she gain from her time in the mine? How do you think this will affect her future?

6. Examine the choices made by three characters from the novel and the resulting consequences for each of them. What lessons can you learn from their lives?

7. Make up your own question, get it approved by Seán and start writing.

NOTES:
1. Always use specific details from the novel to back
up your views.
2. Underline or italicize book titles. Example: Still Mine or Still Mine.

3. When you quote from the text, it is sufficient for this
essay to put the page number in brackets at the end
of your sentence. Example: (p. 214).


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Gr. 12 English Independent Study Unit Seán’s Class

Exploratory Reading:
1.Primary Sources:
* A minimum of two full length books or the equivalent should be read.
*At least one should be a novel. You may also read plays, poetry collections, articles, non-fiction books, biography/autobiography, etc.
* While reading, you should be considering an idea to shape into a thesis
for your essay.

2. Secondary Sources:
* These are readings about your books. A minimum of three items must be consulted.
*An important guideline: your own ideas before the critics.

3. Notes on your books:
Submit brief notes about the following topics for each of your books:
a) Main characters
b) Plot
c) Themes/Issues

Time Management
* Come prepared for conferences with work in progress and with specific proposals and questions for the teacher.
* Use class time productively.

Paper
* All steps of the writing process will be followed and submitted with the paper to be evaluated.
* See “ISU Checklist” sheet for those details.
* Length: College Level = 1200 words
University Level = 1500-2000 words.

Evaluation

Exploratory Reading, Log, Notes = 5 marks

Thesis, Plan, Draft = 5 marks

Essay = 20 marks

Total = 30 marks

 

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Contact School

COURSE  ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION  OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE:

Grade 11 University English

   COURSE CODE:

ENG3U

COURSE TYPE/GRADE:

University/11

 CREDIT VALUE:

1

PREREQUISITE:

Gr. 10 Academic English

DATE:

2016-2017

TEACHER NAME:

Seán Adams

PERIOD:

A

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and

creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will

analyse challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well

as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts

in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and

clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course

is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college

preparation course.

 

OVERALL CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS:

Oral Communication

1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety

of situations for a variety of purposes;

2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate

with different audiences for a variety of purposes;

3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers,

areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.

Reading and Literature Studies

1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of informational, literary,

and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;

2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements

and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;

3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.

Writing

1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write

for an intended purpose and audience;

2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational,

literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;

3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies,

and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work

effectively;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.

                                                                                                                                                                                               

Media Studies

1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;

2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and

explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning;

3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences,

using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters

and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding

and creating media texts.

 

ASSESSMENT:

Throughout the course, a range of instructional strategies will be used to address students’ needs.  Assessment is the onoing proces of gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources. Diagnostic assessments are used to identify students’ strengths and learning needs to assist with planning, modifying and adjusting instruction.  Formative assessments, which occur throughout the learning process, give students multiple opportunities to practice and receive feedback in an effort to improve their learning and achievement of the curriculum expectations.

EVALUATION:

Evaluation measures achievement of the overall curriculum expectations.  They are summative and usually take place at the end of important segments of learning (end of a unit, strand, term, semester), following student practice and constructive feedback.  Evaluations give students an opportunity to apply and demonstrate their learning based on established achievement criteria. 

Seventy per cent (70%) of the final grade will be based on the evaluations conducted during the course. There will be numerous and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four achievement categories according to the weighting described below.  Missed and/or incomplete assignments will have an impact on the final grade where there are a number of curriculum expectations that have not been evaluated because of missed assignments.

Thirty per cent (30%) of the final grade will be based on summative evaluation(s) administered towards the end of the course and following the same weighting of the achievement chart categories as the term evaluation.  All students must take part in the course-culminating activities that make up the 30% final evaluation mark. 

                                                                                                                       

WEIGHTING ACCORDING TO ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES:

Knowledge/Understanding

25

%

 Thinking

25

%

Communication

25

%

Application

25

%

LEARNING SKILLS:

There are six clusters of learning skills required for effective learning, achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success in and out of school: Responsibility, Independent Work, Organization, Initiative, Collaboration and Self-Regulation. 

LATE & MISSED ASSIGNMENTS:

Submitting course work on time is an important aspect of student learning and time management.  Students will be informed of due dates and ultimate deadlines, which is the last opportunity for students to submit an assignment for evaluation.  Late submissions will be reported as part of the learning skills on the report card and a variety of strategies will be used to encourage on-time submission of assignments including parent, student-teacher conferences, counselling, contracts, alternative assignments and extra help.  A mark deduction for late assignments up to and including the full value of the assignment may be used as a last resort.   

ACADEMIC HONESTY:  

Students are expected to be academically honest by submitting their own original work, and the marks they receive are intended to reflect their own academic achievement.  When evidence of dishonesty is confirmed, the incident and the consequences will be communicated to the principal/vice-principal, the student and parent(s)/guardian.

A mark of zero may be awarded for the assignment in question and a repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences.

COMMUNICATION:

Extra help will be available, including before classes, at lunch, and after school.                                                                

Phone calls home will be made regularly to discuss academics, attendance, punctuality or behaviour.

The teacher can be contacted at 416-393-1455.

Formal Parent/Teacher Meetings/Conferences will be twice a year. Upon request, meetings can be arranged at any time during the school year.

COURSE EVALUATION PLAN

30% Final Evaluations

EVALUATION TASKS

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

WEIGHTING (%)

Exams

K/U,  T, C, A

30

70% Course Work

UNIT SEQUENCE

TIMING

(Hrs or Dates)

EVALUATION TASK(S)

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

DUE DATE

Oral Communication

Each Quad

30 Hours

Literature and Media Oral Questions

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Reading and Literature Studies

Each Quad

30 Hours

Oral and Written Responses to Literature and Media

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Writing

Each Quad

30 Hours

Journals, Literature Responses, Reports, Essays, Media Responses, and Tests.

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly & End of Quad

Media Studies

Each Quad

20 Hours

Article and Film Analyses

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Contact School

COURSE  ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION  OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE:

Grade 12 University English

   COURSE CODE:

ENG4CU

COURSE TYPE/GRADE:

University/12

 CREDIT VALUE:

1

PREREQUISITE:

Gr. 11 University English

DATE:

2016-2017

TEACHER NAME:

Seán Adams

PERIOD:

A

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace.

 

 

OVERALL CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS:

Oral Communication

1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety

of situations for a variety of purposes;

2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate

with different audiences for a variety of purposes;

3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers,

areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.

Reading and Literature Studies

1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of informational, literary,

and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;

2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements

and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;

3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.

Writing

1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write

for an intended purpose and audience;

2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational,

literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;

3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies,

and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work

effectively;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for

improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.

 

Media Studies

1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts;

2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning;

3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques;

4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding and creating media texts.


ASSESSMENT:

Throughout the course, a range of instructional strategies will be used to address students’ needs.  Assessment is the onoing proces of gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources. Diagnostic assessments are used to identify students’ strengths and learning needs to assist with planning, modifying and adjusting instruction.  Formative assessments, which occur throughout the learning process, give students multiple opportunities to practice and receive feedback in an effort to improve their learning and achievement of the curriculum expectations.

EVALUATION:

Evaluation measures achievement of the overall curriculum expectations.  They are summative and usually take place at the end of important segments of learning (end of a unit, strand, term, semester), following student practice and constructive feedback.  Evaluations give students an opportunity to apply and demonstrate their learning based on established achievement criteria. 

Seventy per cent (70%) of the final grade will be based on the evaluations conducted during the course. There will be numerous and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four achievement categories according to the weighting described below.  Missed and/or incomplete assignments will have an impact on the final grade where there are a number of curriculum expectations that have not been evaluated because of missed assignments.

Thirty per cent (30%) of the final grade will be based on summative evaluation(s) administered towards the end of the course and following the same weighting of the achievement chart categories as the term evaluation.  All students must take part in the course-culminating activities that make up the 30% final evaluation mark. 

                                                                                                                       

WEIGHTING ACCORDING TO ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES:

Knowledge/Understanding

25

%

 Thinking

25

%

Communication

25

%

Application

25

%


LEARNING SKILLS:

There are six clusters of learning skills required for effective learning, achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success in and out of school: Responsibility, Independent Work, Organization, Initiative, Collaboration and Self-Regulation. 

LATE & MISSED ASSIGNMENTS:

Submitting course work on time is an important aspect of student learning and time management.  Students will be informed of due dates and ultimate deadlines, which is the last opportunity for students to submit an assignment for evaluation.  Late submissions will be reported as part of the learning skills on the report card and a variety of strategies will be used to encourage on-time submission of assignments including parent, student-teacher conferences, counselling, contracts, alternative assignments and extra help.  A mark deduction for late assignments up to and including the full value of the assignment may be used as a last resort.   

ACADEMIC HONESTY:  

Students are expected to be academically honest by submitting their own original work, and the marks they receive are intended to reflect their own academic achievement.  When evidence of dishonesty is confirmed, the incident and the consequences will be communicated to the principal/vice-principal, the student and parent(s)/guardian.

A mark of zero may be awarded for the assignment in question and a repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences.

COMMUNICATION:

 

Extra help will be available, including before classes, at lunch, and after school.                                                               

Phone calls home will be made regularly to discuss academics, attendance, punctuality or behaviour.

The teacher can be contacted at 416-393-1455.

Formal Parent/Teacher Meetings/Conferences will be twice a year. Upon request, meetings can be arranged at any time during the school year.

 

COURSE EVALUATION PLAN

30% Final Evaluations

EVALUATION TASKS

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

WEIGHTING (%)

Exams

K/U,  T, C, A

30

70% Course Work

UNIT SEQUENCE

TIMING

(Hrs or Dates)

EVALUATION TASK(S)

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

DUE DATE

Oral Communication

Each Quad

30 Hours

Literature and Media Oral Questions

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Reading and Literature Studies

Each Quad

30 Hours

Oral and Written Responses to Literature and Media

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly

Writing

Each Quad

30 Hours

Journals, Literature Responses, Reports, Essays, Media Responses, and Tests.

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly & End of Quad

Media Studies

Each Quad

20 Hours

Article and Film Analyses

K/U, T, C, A

Weekly