10 English Quad 1

The Hunger Games

 

 

 

 

 

Quad 1 Dates

 

Discussion 1
The Hunger Games

Chapters 1-2

1. What is the setting of the opening of the novel?

2. List the main characters and describe each of them.

3. What are the living conditions like for Katniss and in District 12?

4. State the meaning of the following terms
a) Reaping
b) Panem
c) Capitol
d) District 12
e) Peacekeepers
f) Tessera
g) Hunger Games

5. What role does Katniss have to take on when her father dies?

6. Does Katniss want to have kids? Why or why not?

7. How does Peeta help Katniss when she was 7 years old?

 

Discussion 2
The Hunger Games

Chapters 3-4

1. Katniss thinks that "Crying is not an option". Why does she think this? Why does Peeta not worry about showing signs that he was crying?

2. What does Katniss think about her chances in the Hunger Games? What motivates her to tell Prim that she will try to win the Games?

3. Who is Madge and what gift does she give Katniss?

4. What is a Mockingjay?

5. Katniss thinks that "A kind Peeta Mellark is far more dangerous to me than an unkind one". Explain why she thinks this.

6. Describe Katniss' relationship with her mother.

7. Why does Haymitch drink so much alcohol?

 

Discussion 3
The Hunger Games

Chapters 5-6

1. How is Cinna different from the other people in Katniss' prep team?

2. How is the Capitol different from District 12?

3. How are Katniss and Peeta received when they enter the Capitol in the chariot? What is rebellious about their presentation?

4. Katniss thinks "Don't be stupid. Peeta is trying to kill you. He is luring you in to make you easy prey". Is she right about Peeta?

5. Why is it ironic that Effie refers to the "barbarism" of District 12?

6. What is an Avox? How does Katniss know the Avox who is serving her at dinner?

 

Discussion 4
The Hunger Games

Chapters 7-8

1. Why does Katniss have so many nightmares?

2. What two pieces strategic advice does Haymitch give Katniss and Peeta?

3. What are "Career Tributes"?

4. What does Katniss do in her private session during training? What does this reveal about her character? Why does she lock herself in her room and cry for an hour afterwards?

5. What mark does Katniss get in her training evaluation? Why is this important?

6. Who is Rue and what do we know about her so far?

7. Describe how Katniss meets Gale and the nature of their relationship.

8. "Gale and I were thrown together by a mutual need to survive. Peeta and I know the other's survival means our own death" (p. 112). What does this quote reveal about the relationships between the 3 characters?

 

Discussion 5
The Hunger Games

Chapters 9-10

1. What do we learn about Katniss' character when Haymitch is preparing her for the television interview?

2. What is Cinna's advice for Katniss for the interview and how does it play out in the actual interview?

3. What bombshell does Peeta reveal in his interview? How does Katniss react to it?

4. What does "star-crossed lovers" mean? How does this image of Katniss change how she is perceived in the Games?

5. What does Peeta mean when he says "I want to die as myself "? (P. 141.). How does this contrast with Katniss' attitude on the eve of the Games?

 

Discussion 6
The Hunger Games

Chapters 11-12

1. In the arena, why doesn't Katniss try to get the bow and arrows that she sees?

2. What traumatic incident happens to Katniss in the first minute in the arena? Why is she not traumatized?

3. What is so disturbing about the betting that takes place during the Games?

4. What does Katniss find in her knapsack?

5. How does Katniss feel when she discovers that Peeta has joined the pack of Careers?

6. What is the biggest challenge Katniss faces on her second day in the Games?

 

Discussion 7
The Hunger Games

Chapters 13-14

1. What is the connection between Cinna's decision to style Katniss as "the girl on fire" and the Gamesmakers' decision to use fire against Katniss in the arena?

2. "Somewhere, in a cool and spotless room, a Gamemaker sits at a set of controls, fingers on the triggers that could end my life in a second." How is the situation that Katniss faces similar to victims of American drone attacks?

3. When Katniss is trapped in the tree, how does Rue help her? How does Haymitch help her?

4. What are tracker jackers?

5. If Peeta helps Katniss escape from Cato, then why did he join the Career pack in the first place?

 

Discussion 8
The Hunger Games

Chapters 15-16

1. What fears are triggered in Katniss as a result of the tracker jacket venom?

2. How does Katniss' strategy in the Arena change once she has acquired the bow and arrows?

3. Why does Katniss choose Rue as an ally?

4. What plan do Rue and Katniss have as they go on the offence?

5. Why do the Career Tributes leave their stockpile unguarded?

 

Discussion 9
The Hunger Games

Chapters 17-18

1. What injuries does Katniss suffer in the explosion?

2. How does the fact that Prim is watching the Games on TV affect Katniss?

3. Why does Cato want to kill Katniss so badly?

4. So far, who has helped Katniss in the Games?

5. Who does Katniss hold responsible for Rue's murder?

6. Explain how Katniss' three finger salute is a form of rebellion against the capitol.

7. What is the significance of District 11's gift to Katniss?

8. Why does Katniss involuntarily call out Peeta's name at the end of the chapter?

 

Discussion 10
The Hunger Games

Chapters 19-20

1. Why did the Gamesmakers make the rule change to allow two tributes from the same district to win?

2. Why does Katniss start looking for Peeta?

3. What is Peeta's condition when Katniss finds him?

4. What happens as a result of Katniss kissing Peeta? What does Katniss learn from this?

5. Is Peeta acting for the cameras when he shows he loves Katniss? What about Katniss - is she acting?

6. What happy story does Katniss tell Peeta?

7. Why does Katniss want to go to the "Feast" announced by Claudius Templesmith? Why does Peeta not want her to go?

 

Discussion 11
The Hunger Games

Chapters 21-22

1. How does Foxface manage to survive without killing anyone in the Arena?

2. Clove survives by taking pleasure in being cruel, torturing, and killing others. Why is she like this?

3. Why does Thresh kills Clove, but decides to spare Katniss?

4. How does Thresh's decision to spare Katniss subvert the whole purpose of the Hunger Games?

5. Why did Peeta give bread to Katniss when they were children?

6. Give 4 reasons why Katniss doesn't want Peeta to die in the Games.

7. What does Peeta mean when he tell Katniss "Haymitch said you'd take a lot of convincing"? Why does it take her so long to be convinced?

 

Discussion 12
The Hunger Games

Chapters 23-24

1. What reasons does Katniss come up with to explain Haymitch's excessive drinking?

2. What is Katniss' reaction when Thresh dies?

3. When Katniss considers for the first time that she might survive the Games, she contemplates her future and decides that she will never marry and never "risk" having kids. Why does she feel this way?

4. How does Foxface die?

5. In chapter 23, Katniss kisses Peeta on the forehead. Why does she do this and what does the reveal about her character?

 

Discussion 13
The Hunger Games

Chapters 25-26

1. Katniss has a chance to kill Cato when he is doubled up and out of breath. Why doesn't she do it?

2. What is especially horrific about the design of the Mutts?

3. How does Katniss manage to shoot Cato and save Peeta at the same time?

4. Why is Cato's death so long and drawn out?

5. What rule change is made by Claudius Templesmith?

6. Why do Katniss and Peeta prefer to die themselves over killing each other?

7. Why does Templesmith allow both Katniss and Peeta to live after all?

8. After Katniss and Peeta survive the Arena, Katniss thinks that "... the most dangerous part of the Hunger Games is about to begin". What does she mean by this?

9. Katniss' feelings for Peeta are very complex. List the 5 reasons she had for working with Peeta in the Games and for playing up the love angle as part of her strategy.

 

Discussion 14
The Hunger Games

Chapter 27

1. What is the theme of the 3 hour video summary? Why is this significant?

2. In the final interview with Caesar Flickerman, how are Katniss’ and Peeta’s performances different?

3. On the train stop on the way back to District 12, Peeta finds out that Katniss was acting the whole time about being in love with him. How does he react to this realization?

4. Who is the real Katniss Everdeen? How has she been emotionally manipulated and traumatized in the Games? How is she a changed person?

 

 

10 English
Seán's Class


Own Topic Journals

Length = 30 lines, full sentence and paragraph format, proofread.

You can write about any topic you want, but you must stay on that topic. That is, don’t wander from one topic to another. Instead, pick an issue and discuss it in two paragraphs.

Some students decide to write a poem or a short story and this is fine.

Other students have a hard time coming up with ideas. If you can’t think of a topic, you can choose from the list below:

1. Educational goals (3 paragraphs): What are your educational goals for this year? What might be some obstacles that may get in your way? What strategies can you use to overcome these obstacles?

2. The Best (3 paragraphs): The best movie you’ve seen. The best book you’ve read. The best music you’ve heard.

3. Controversial Issue (3 paragraphs): Pick an issue from the list below and present one side of the issue, the opposite view, and where you stand and why.
• Drugs
• War
• Abortion
• Capital Punishment
• Current issues: violence in schools, tasers, etc.
• Relationship Abuse
• “isms”: racism, sexism, classism, homophobia, etc.
• Native Rights


What I saw (or thought) on my way here today
The most important thing for me right now is ...
A dream (real or imaginary)
What would I do today with a) one hundred dollars b) one million dollars c) ten dollars
A most enjoyable day
A memorable person or an interesting character
What is the good life?
I don’t like ...
A favourite activity
I’m proud of myself because...
A wonderful day
My freedom is important to me
I worry about
A dream
What it is like to be old
A good friend
A false friend
A beautiful place
Money is a drug
My favourite part of Toronto
Doing the right thing
A very difficult person
Someone I admire
How children should be raised
How children should not be raised
What I want is ...
A season I like is ...
I (or we) shall overcome
One thing that makes me angry is ...
One thing that makes me happy is ...
Pets

The journal can describe your own life, dreams, or experiences. but does not have to. You can “make up “ responses to these ideas as if you were another person.

Quad 1 10 English Seán’s Class
Literature Response Topics
The Hunger Games

Please write 30 lines for any 5 of the topics below in complete sentence and paragraph form (2 paragraphs).

1. Describe the relationships Katniss has with her mother and father, Gale, and Primrose. What do these relationships reveal about Katniss’ character?

2. Define dystopia. How is Panem a dystopian society? Describe how it looks, how its citizens act, what they value, and how the Districts are controlled.

3. Why does the Capitol have the tradition of the Hunger Games? What is the purpose and how does it advance their cause?

4. “A warning bell goes off in my head. Don’t be so stupid. Peeta is planning how to kill you, I remind myself. He is luring you in to make you easy prey. The more likeable he is, the more deadly he is. But because two can play at this game, I stand on tiptoe and kiss his cheek....” (p.72).

Why is Katniss hostile to Peeta once they are chosen as tributes? How does this change as they prepare for the Games?

5. Cite evidence that the love relationship between Katniss and Peeta is real, then cite evidence it is just a show for the cameras. What are your conclusions about their relationship.

6. With reference to the novel, how real is reality TV? How does this compare to other reality shows on TV?

7. What is the importance of alliances for survival in The Hunger Games? Describe examples from your life where alliances have helped you.

8. How is the way Katniss plays the Hunger Games a rebellion to President Snow and the Capitol? Why does Snow see Katniss as a threat?

9. How realistic is the premise of the Hunger Games in our world? Could something like this ever happen in our society? Why or why not?

Quad 1 10 English Seán’s Class
Film Review: The Hunger Games


Please write in complete sentences and paragraphs and write 50-75 lines (10-15 lines per question).

1. Choose one character from the novel/film and discuss how each medium presents that character.

2. Pick a scene from the film that you think worked really well and explain why it was so good. (What did it add to the story, its themes or characters?)

3. How did it feel to watch teens killing teens? Did you feel like cheering? Why or why not? Did you feel the same way reading about the tributes deaths as you did watching them die? How was it different?

4. Did you notice how powerfully the symbols energized the oppressed people and subverted the empire? What do you think Katniss meant by covering Rue with flowers? How did the District hand signal function (Katniss’ flashes it twice, in The Reaping and at Rue’s death)?

5. In the film, some changes are made in the plot. Evaluate two of these changes.


Quad 1 10 English Seán’s Class

Essay Topics

The Hunger Games

Please answer one of the following questions in a well organized 5 paragraph essay. Length = Applied - 500 words. Academic - 750 words.

1. Katniss Everdeen is a hero. Discuss, feeling free to agree or disagree.

2. Examine the concept of the strong female hero in popular culture, include Katniss Everdeen fromThe Hunger Games in your discussion.

3. Consider Katniss’ role living in an oppressive society. Should citizens just submit to authoritarian rule or is it important for them to rise up? Include in your discussion the risks versus the benefits.

4. What is the main political message of The Hunger Games?

5. Examine the use of propaganda in The Hunger Games. How does the Capitol use it to their advantage and how does Katniss use it to hers?

6. Make up your own question, get it approved by Seán, start writing.

10 Academic English
Seán's Class

Own Book Report


Please write 2 pages (30 lines) in complete sentences and paragraphs.
Each question should be answered in one paragraph.

1. Compare and contrast the two main characters in the book.

2. Briefly, describe the plot of the story, especially the key events (write one paragraph only).

3. What is the moral of the story? In short, what message does the author want to give to you, the reader?

4. Give three reasons why you liked or disliked the book.

5. Make up your own question about the book and answer it. (The question and answer are both important.)

The Hunger Games

Characters

Katniss Everdeen  -  the protagonist and female tribute of District 12. She is an excellent hunter and tremendously resourceful.

Peeta Mellark  -  the boy tribute of District 12 and the son of a baker. He is kind and loyal, and he becomes Katniss’s love interest and main ally during the Hunger Games.

Haymitch Abernathy  -  Katniss’s and Peeta’s trainer. He is a drunk and one of only two people from District 12 to win the Hunger Games (and the only one still living).

Effie Trinket  -  the escort of the tributes from District 12. She is very concerned with appearances and her own career.

Gale  -  Katniss’s friend and hunting partner. Gale is probably the person closest to Katniss, and he is the only with whom she can ever fully relax and be herself.

Prim Everdeen  -  Katniss’s little sister. She is small and gentle, and Katniss volunteers in her place when her name is drawn in the reaping.

Mother (Everdeen)  -  Katniss’s mother. After her husband died, she essentially stopped caring for Katniss and Prim, forcing Katniss to become the family’s primary provider.

Cinna  -  Katniss’s main stylist. He becomes Katniss’s friend over the course of the story and counsels Katniss to be herself.

Madge Undersee  -  the Mayor’s daughter and the only person Katniss is friendly with at school. She gives Katniss the mockingjay pin.

Mayor Undersee  -  the mayor of District 12

Venia  -  the person who waxes Katniss before she sees Cinna, her stylist
Cato  -  the male tribute from District 2. He is a career tribute, meaning he has trained for the Hunger Games his entire life, and he is large, short-tempered, and a fierce fighter.

Rue  -  the female tribute from District 11. Katniss and Rue become allies during the Games, and Katniss

Foxface  -  a female tribute in the Hunger Games characterized by her wiliness and intelligence. She dies by eating poisonous berries collected by Peeta.

Thresh  -  the male tribute from District 11. He shows mercy toward Katniss because of the way Katniss treated Rue.

Glimmer  -  the female tribute from District 1. She dies when Katniss drops a tracker jacker nest on her and some other tributes.

Clove  -  the female tribute from District 2. She actually defeats Katniss in a fight and nearly kills her, but Thresh intervenes and saves Katniss’s life.

Caesar Flickerman  -  the ostentatious television host who interviews Katniss and Peeta before and after the Games

Claudius Templesmith  -  the announcer during the Hunger Games

President Snow  -  the president of Panem

Contact School
COURSE  ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION  OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE:

Grade 10 Academic English

   COURSE CODE:

ENG2D

COURSE TYPE/GRADE:

Academic/10

 CREDIT VALUE:

1

PREREQUISITE:

Gr. 9 Academic or Applied English

DATE:

2016-2017

TEACHER NAME:

Seán Adams

PERIOD:

B and D

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

 

This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the selective use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. This course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 11 university or college preparation course.

OVERALL CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS:

 

Oral Communication
1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety
of situations for a variety of purposes;
2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate
with different audiences for a variety of purposes;
3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers,
areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.

Reading and Literature Studies
1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of informational, literary,
and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;
2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements
and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;
3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;
4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for
improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.

Writing
1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write
for an intended purpose and audience;
2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational,
literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;
3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies,
and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work
effectively;
4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for
improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.
             

Text Box: Media Studies 1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts; 2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning; 3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences, using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques; 4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding and creating media texts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSESSMENT:

Throughout the course, a range of instructional strategies will be used to address students’ needs.  Assessment is the onoing proces of gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources. Diagnostic assessments are used to identify students’ strengths and learning needs to assist with planning, modifying and adjusting instruction.  Formative assessments, which occur throughout the learning process, give students multiple opportunities to practice and receive feedback in an effort to improve their learning and achievement of the curriculum expectations.
EVALUATION:

Evaluation measures achievement of the overall curriculum expectations.  They are summative and usually take place at the end of important segments of learning (end of a unit, strand, term, semester), following student practice and constructive feedback.  Evaluations give students an opportunity to apply and demonstrate their learning based on established achievement criteria. 
Seventy per cent (70%) of the final grade will be based on the evaluations conducted during the course. There will be numerous and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four achievement categories according to the weighting described below.  Missed and/or incomplete assignments will have an impact on the final grade where there are a number of curriculum expectations that have not been evaluated because of missed assignments.
Thirty per cent (30%) of the final grade will be based on summative evaluation(s) administered towards the end of the course and following the same weighting of the achievement chart categories as the term evaluation.  All students must take part in the course-culminating activities that make up the 30% final evaluation mark. 

                                                                                                                       

WEIGHTING ACCORDING TO ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES:

 

Knowledge/Understanding

25

%

 Thinking

25

%

Communication

25

%

Application

25

%


LEARNING SKILLS:

There are six clusters of learning skills required for effective learning, achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success in and out of school: Responsibility, Independent Work, Organization, Initiative, Collaboration and Self-Regulation. 

LATE & MISSED ASSIGNMENTS:

Submitting course work on time is an important aspect of student learning and time management.  Students will be informed of due dates and ultimate deadlines, which is the last opportunity for students to submit an assignment for evaluation.  Late submissions will be reported as part of the learning skills on the report card and a variety of strategies will be used to encourage on-time submission of assignments including parent, student-teacher conferences, counselling, contracts, alternative assignments and extra help.  A mark deduction for late assignments up to and including the full value of the assignment may be used as a last resort.   

ACADEMIC HONESTY:  

Students are expected to be academically honest by submitting their own original work, and the marks they receive are intended to reflect their own academic achievement.  When evidence of dishonesty is confirmed, the incident and the consequences will be communicated to the principal/vice-principal, the student and parent(s)/guardian.

A mark of zero may be awarded for the assignment in question and a repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences.

COMMUNICATION:

 

Extra help will be available, including before classes, at lunch, and after school.                                                                
Phone calls home will be made regularly to discuss academics, attendance, punctuality or behaviour.
The teacher can be contacted at 416-393-1455.
Formal Parent/Teacher Meetings/Conferences will be twice a year. Upon request, meetings can be arranged at any time during the school year.

COURSE EVALUATION PLAN

 

30% Final Evaluations

EVALUATION TASKS

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

WEIGHTING (%)

 

Exam and Essay

 

K/U,  T, C, A

 

30

70% Course Work

 

UNIT SEQUENCE

TIMING
(Hrs or Dates)

EVALUATION TASK(S)

 

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

 

DUE DATE

 

Oral Communication

 

 

 

 

Each Quad
30 Hours

 

Literature and Media Oral Questions

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading and Literature Studies

 

Each Quad
30 Hours

Oral and Written Responses to Literature and Media

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing

 

Each Quad
30 Hours

Journals, Literature Responses, Reports, Essays, Media Responses, and Tests.

 

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly & End of Quad

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Media Studies

 

Each Quad
20 Hours

Article and Film Analyses

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact School
COURSE  ASSESSMENT/EVALUATION  OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE:

Grade 10 Applied English

   COURSE CODE:

ENG2P

COURSE TYPE/GRADE:

Academic/10

 CREDIT VALUE:

1

PREREQUISITE:

Gr. 9 Academic or Applied English

DATE:

2016-2017

TEACHER NAME:

Seán Adams

PERIOD:

B and D

COURSE DESCRIPTION :

 

This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in secondary school and daily life. Students will study and create a variety of informational, literary, and graphic texts. An important focus will be on the consolidation of strategies and processes that help students interpret texts and communicate clearly and effectively. This course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 11 college or workplace preparation course.

OVERALL CURRICULUM EXPECTATIONS:

 

Oral Communication
1. Listening to Understand: listen in order to understand and respond appropriately in a variety
of situations for a variety of purposes;
2. Speaking to Communicate: use speaking skills and strategies appropriately to communicate
with different audiences for a variety of purposes;
3. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as listeners and speakers,
areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in oral communication situations.

Reading and Literature Studies
1. Reading for Meaning: read and demonstrate an understanding of a variety of informational, literary,
and graphic texts, using a range of strategies to construct meaning;
2. Understanding Form and Style: recognize a variety of text forms, text features, and stylistic elements
and demonstrate understanding of how they help communicate meaning;
3. Reading With Fluency: use knowledge of words and cueing systems to read fluently;
4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as readers, areas for
improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading.

Writing
1. Developing and Organizing Content: generate, gather, and organize ideas and information to write
for an intended purpose and audience;
2. Using Knowledge of Form and Style: draft and revise their writing, using a variety of informational,
literary, and graphic forms and stylistic elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;
3. Applying Knowledge of Conventions: use editing, proofreading, and publishing skills and strategies,
and knowledge of language conventions, to correct errors, refine expression, and present their work
effectively;
4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as writers, areas for
improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful at different stages in the writing process.
             

Text Box: Media Studies 1. Understanding Media Texts: demonstrate an understanding of a variety of media texts; 2. Understanding Media Forms, Conventions, and Techniques: identify some media forms and explain how the conventions and techniques associated with them are used to create meaning; 3. Creating Media Texts: create a variety of media texts for different purposes and audiences, using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques; 4. Reflecting on Skills and Strategies: reflect on and identify their strengths as media interpreters and creators, areas for improvement, and the strategies they found most helpful in understanding and creating media texts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSESSMENT:

Throughout the course, a range of instructional strategies will be used to address students’ needs.  Assessment is the onoing proces of gathering and analyzing information from a variety of sources. Diagnostic assessments are used to identify students’ strengths and learning needs to assist with planning, modifying and adjusting instruction.  Formative assessments, which occur throughout the learning process, give students multiple opportunities to practice and receive feedback in an effort to improve their learning and achievement of the curriculum expectations.
EVALUATION:

Evaluation measures achievement of the overall curriculum expectations.  They are summative and usually take place at the end of important segments of learning (end of a unit, strand, term, semester), following student practice and constructive feedback.  Evaluations give students an opportunity to apply and demonstrate their learning based on established achievement criteria. 
Seventy per cent (70%) of the final grade will be based on the evaluations conducted during the course. There will be numerous and varied opportunities for students to demonstrate their achievement of the curriculum expectations across all four achievement categories according to the weighting described below.  Missed and/or incomplete assignments will have an impact on the final grade where there are a number of curriculum expectations that have not been evaluated because of missed assignments.
Thirty per cent (30%) of the final grade will be based on summative evaluation(s) administered towards the end of the course and following the same weighting of the achievement chart categories as the term evaluation.  All students must take part in the course-culminating activities that make up the 30% final evaluation mark. 

                                                                                                                       

WEIGHTING ACCORDING TO ACHIEVEMENT CHART CATEGORIES:

 

Knowledge/Understanding

25

%

 Thinking

25

%

Communication

25

%

Application

25

%


LEARNING SKILLS:

There are six clusters of learning skills required for effective learning, achievement of the curriculum expectations and student success in and out of school: Responsibility, Independent Work, Organization, Initiative, Collaboration and Self-Regulation. 

LATE & MISSED ASSIGNMENTS:

Submitting course work on time is an important aspect of student learning and time management.  Students will be informed of due dates and ultimate deadlines, which is the last opportunity for students to submit an assignment for evaluation.  Late submissions will be reported as part of the learning skills on the report card and a variety of strategies will be used to encourage on-time submission of assignments including parent, student-teacher conferences, counselling, contracts, alternative assignments and extra help.  A mark deduction for late assignments up to and including the full value of the assignment may be used as a last resort.   

ACADEMIC HONESTY:  

Students are expected to be academically honest by submitting their own original work, and the marks they receive are intended to reflect their own academic achievement.  When evidence of dishonesty is confirmed, the incident and the consequences will be communicated to the principal/vice-principal, the student and parent(s)/guardian.

A mark of zero may be awarded for the assignment in question and a repeated pattern of academic dishonesty may result in an escalating severity of consequences.

COMMUNICATION:

 

Extra help will be available, including before classes, at lunch, and after school.                                                                
Phone calls home will be made regularly to discuss academics, attendance, punctuality or behaviour.
The teacher can be contacted at 416-393-1455.
Formal Parent/Teacher Meetings/Conferences will be twice a year. Upon request, meetings can be arranged at any time during the school year.

COURSE EVALUATION PLAN

 

30% Final Evaluations

EVALUATION TASKS

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

WEIGHTING (%)

 

Exam and Essay

 

K/U,  T, C, A

 

30

70% Course Work

 

UNIT SEQUENCE

TIMING
(Hrs or Dates)

EVALUATION TASK(S)

 

ACHIEVEMENT CHART FOCUS

 

DUE DATE

 

Oral Communication

 

 

 

 

Each Quad
30 Hours

 

Literature and Media Oral Questions

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading and Literature Studies

 

Each Quad
30 Hours

Oral and Written Responses to Literature and Media

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing

 

Each Quad
30 Hours

Journals, Literature Responses, Reports, Essays, Media Responses, and Tests.

 

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly & End of Quad

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Media Studies

 

Each Quad
20 Hours

Article and Film Analyses

 

K/U, T, C, A

 

Weekly